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Thread: Will DC voltage Cause GFCI Trips?

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Will DC voltage Cause GFCI Trips?

    Quote Originally Posted by 1pet2_9 View Post
    Note that I am never saying to remove GFCI from an outdoor or close-to-water outlet which is required to have GFCI by code (unless it is on a boat).

    You can, however, route your power to DC from a non-GFCI outlet, and leave your wall warts out of the elements (just like practically every other wall wart in your house is not on GFCI already--such as the one you are likely using right now to read this post). A lot of our displays run more than 20 amps, and so we tend to split our displays across multiple circuit breakers already. I've done nonprofit displays out in old parks that had no GFCI at all, and it rained. I only lost a couple of elves (Dobby is a free elf. And if you get that joke, then my wife will love you...).
    Ha-ha; Dobby says"In practice, most builders of recreational boats end up providing GFCI protection for all of the AC receptacles on the boat, but standards only require it in the areas identified here. You would not necessarily need GFCI protection in a sleeping cabin."

    1pet2_9; good point - "You can, however, route your power to DC from a non-GFCI outlet" but that cannot be the garage = GFCI required. Must be within the house (no kitchen or bath) Now how far is that going to be from the elements - voltage drop?
    In Lights Therapy

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Will DC voltage Cause GFCI Trips?

    You distribute 120VAC power from the non-GFCI breakers, however you choose. But wall-wart it down to DC before it goes out in the elements.

    If you have your Christmas display on the water (which is not a bad idea...the water provides a nice backdrop), then no surge protectors on boats. i.e. it's good to protect your circuitry near water--unless the circuit is literally sitting on top of the water. That leaves your ground floating. You will basically have a Viking funeral pyre, cremating Santa Claus as he drifts peacefully off into the moonlight. Probably not the Christmas effect you were going for.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Will DC voltage Cause GFCI Trips?

    Someone discussed this in another thread recently and the solution was to install several more protected outlets. The more outlets lessened the drop on each outlet so that the GFCI was not tripped. Consult with an electrician and build a GFCI distribution box with the maximum circuits allowed. A second solution was to find the offending lights and throw them away!

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Will DC voltage Cause GFCI Trips?

    The OP was about whether DC circuits will offend at all.

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