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timon
06-16-2012, 09:25 PM
I was looking for a vacuum pin for manually placing SMD parts on the boards I hope to build when I came across this device (http://www.abacom-tech.com/%2FManual-SMT-Pick-and-Place-Machine-ezPick-P93496.aspx). It's really an ingenious device and I'd really like to have but too bad it cost $600.

14270

mrpackethead
06-16-2012, 10:11 PM
I bought one. Its a waste of money It looks great, and sounds awesome.. its just hopeless to use... I found a 2nd hand DIMA FP-600 on ebay, and bought that.. Much much better.

timon
06-16-2012, 10:36 PM
That's look to me to be in a totally different league. Just for fun I checked eBay, nothing, but I assume they don't show up that often. What do they go for used?

timon
06-17-2012, 10:36 AM
Found a local supplier for a few things I was looking for.


Electrical Pick and Place Vacuum Pens (http://www.smtmax.com/detail.php?id=69)
14276
I could make one but for this price it's not worth the time.


Hot Air Rework Station (http://www.smtmax.com/detail.php?id=141)
14277
I like this one since I need a heat shrink hot air gun and this will do both soldering/unsoldering SMD components and shrinking tubing.

jrock64
06-17-2012, 11:30 AM
I may be missing the point here,
but how is a $600 or even $60 vacuum gadget
better than my $3 tweezers.

It all comes down to a steady hand.
If you don't have one, you don't stand a chance.

Joel

N7XG
06-17-2012, 12:19 PM
How about a device for less than 10 bucks.

Go to Goodwill and purchase a fish tank airpump. A simple mod can make it suck air rather than produce air. Then get a chunk of tubing and a brass tube from your local hobby shop and you have a neat little device.

Here is a link:

http://qrpbuilder.com/downloads/smd%20device%20041510.pdf

timon
06-17-2012, 01:11 PM
Ok, did some more looking around and found these Build an SMD Vacuum Pick and Place Tool (http://www.instructables.com/id/Circuit-Board-Lab-POV-Business-Card/step5/Build-an-SMD-Vacuum-Pick-and-Place-Tool/) and Build a Reflow Oven & Controller (http://www.instructables.com/id/Circuit-Board-Lab-POV-Business-Card/step4/Build-a-Reflow-Oven-Controller/). It looks like all of the nozzles out there fit a syringe.

That pump does look easy to modify and should be quiet and my local PetCo should have them.

I still like the idea of a hot air rework station.

Just looking at options.

mrpackethead
06-17-2012, 04:09 PM
That's look to me to be in a totally different league. Just for fun I checked eBay, nothing, but I assume they don't show up that often. What do they go for used?

yup, i've only ever seen one 2nd hand once, and thats the one i bought, and i paid USD$1800. As you say, a different league.

mrpackethead
06-17-2012, 04:14 PM
I may be missing the point here,
but how is a $600 or even $60 vacuum gadget
better than my $3 tweezers.

It all comes down to a steady hand.
If you don't have one, you don't stand a chance.

Joel

You can use tweezers successfully even for the smallest of jobs. But it will take you a lot more time, and you will make many more mistakes. The problem with the $600 device suggested above was its build quality.. It was just two clunky and the vacuum on / off mechanism is just silly.. The dima i have turns it self on and off, the moment you touch a part, and put it down.. all automatically.. you can twist the part with a fine vernier sscrew, and the Z Axis is on a linear slide bearing.. very smooth.. The X/Y is very smooth as well, on precision bearings.. I'm sure that given some DIY effort you could build something similar, for a lot less than the $6000 new that the Dima costs. The method that the other machine uses with the pantograph arm, isn't up to the task.

ErnieHorning
06-17-2012, 08:32 PM
I used one of the pantograph types. It took me awhile to get it adjusted right.

I had it set to just slightly bigger than 1:1 ratio. It had a vacuum switch for the left hand and a knob that you used to lift the head and rotate it. The rotation was done with a simple rubber belt. The head was just a 10th inch flat hypo needle. The vacuum was provided with basically a fish pump.

My company probably paid around a grand for it but it was simple enough that it could have been DIY’ed pretty easily.

I still think my current way of using a tweezers and a soldering iron under a microscope is quicker though. :neutral:

mrpackethead
06-18-2012, 04:55 AM
@Earnie.. THe pantograph thing was slower than using tweezers.. it was clumsy and crappy.. The 2nd hand dima we got, speed things up by a factor of 5. A massively different machine.