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cparsons2391
05-02-2012, 10:56 PM
As the title says, this is about mounting a Solid State Relay in an outlet box.
I know this has been done before, but I wanted to post a link to my website showing how I did mine.
I thought this might be helpful for anyone new or it may just be interesting for older members to look at.
http://www.parsonsfamilychristmas.com/ssr_project.html

-cparsons2391 :)

dirknerkle
05-02-2012, 11:51 PM
Nice! well crafted!!! I do much the same thing -- I put my 4-channel MiniRen wireless controllers inside a Carlon box, filling any holes or knockout spaces with hot glue to seal out the really bad stuff... Outlet boxes make excellent SSR containers.

n1ist
05-03-2012, 07:44 AM
If you don't break the tabs on the neutral (silver screw) side, that will save two wires. May be easier to fit all in the box.
/mike

Justin Smith
05-03-2012, 08:15 AM
From the code standpoint, you used the wrong box, and you can't have the network cable in the box.

cparsons2391
05-03-2012, 09:13 AM
Nice! well crafted!!! I do much the same thing -- I put my 4-channel MiniRen wireless controllers inside a Carlon box, filling any holes or knockout spaces with hot glue to seal out the really bad stuff... Outlet boxes make excellent SSR containers.
I knew I had seen it somewhere before!! I just was unsure where.


If you don't break the tabs on the neutral (silver screw) side, that will save two wires. May be easier to fit all in the box.
/mike
I realized that after the first one I built. Actually, I do that on my others, but for simplicity I thought it would just be easier to explain it like I originally did it. I didn't want to start confusing people about sharing neutrals. LOL


From the code standpoint, you used the wrong box, and you can't have the network cable in the box.
If that is the only code I have broken, I think I am doing good!! LOL

Wayne J
05-03-2012, 11:38 AM
From the code standpoint, you used the wrong box, and you can't have the network cable in the box.

With that statement, we couldn't use any controller we have here, now could we.

CaptKirk
05-03-2012, 04:58 PM
... filling any holes or knockout spaces with hot glue to seal out the really bad stuff...

Mr. Nerkle,
Check out "Plumbers Goop" (or Shoe Goop), as I have found that holds up to moisture and cold better than hot glue. It sticks better than silicon seal and as good as hot glue. The bonus is the fumes where you start to see all your lights light up even unpowered!! Whoa- colors!!! :freak:

(Kids, I am making a joke here - do NOT huff things- the fumes are dangerous to your health- dont be stupid.)

dirknerkle
05-03-2012, 05:03 PM
Yah, I've used GOOP before. Good stuff. I find that I can usually "force-feed" the hot glue into the knock-out edges, and some of it seeps through a bit, and of course it hardens quickly... so they've worked pretty well. We don't have much rain here in the Winter... it comes as snowflakes :lol: so there's not a lot to keep out.

I like GOOP. Fixed a lot of shoes with it!

dmcole
05-03-2012, 05:51 PM
I use the Carlton A238 box, which needs no sealing ... also, the floor (or back wall, depending upon your perspective) is flat, so I can glue stand-offs in.

http://www.pacificalights.info/index.php/tech/17-ssr4.html

\dmc

Wayne J
05-03-2012, 09:45 PM
I use the Carlton A238 box, which needs no sealing ... also, the floor (or back wall, depending upon your perspective) is flat, so I can glue stand-offs in.

http://www.pacificalights.info/index.php/tech/17-ssr4.html

\dmc

That is the same box I used to use. VERY nice units.

CaptKirk
05-04-2012, 02:02 PM
That is nice that it uses knockouts for the wire feeds rather than the cheesy built-in open wire clamp in so many electrical boxes. I need to track a few of those down. Thanks for the tip..