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Thread: Controlling 110 VAC wireframes

  1. #1
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    Default Controlling 110 VAC wireframes

    Newbie question:

    1. Can xLights be used to sequence incandescent light strings on wireframes?

    2. What is the missing hardware in the following control flow diagram:

    Falcon F-48 controller > Falcon differential board > ???? > 110VAC light string

    Thanks for pointing me in the right direction.

    Dick

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Controlling 110 VAC wireframes

    Hi Dick,

    Welcome to the Madness of Holiday Lights.

    xLights can definitely be used to sequence incan light strings. You need to add an AC controller of some type to your system I personally use Renard boards (You should be able to pick up something used off the Buy/Sell forum at a good price). While I CAN run them off of my F-48, I choose to instead have my Raspberry Pi (Show Computer) directly connected to both my Falcon and Renard boards.

    How many channels (different AC strings) are you looking to control?
    2012 - 1st year 64 Channels - 7500 LED lights - 5 sequences
    2013 - 128 Channels - 10,000 LED lights - 7 sequences (2 New)
    2014 - 201 Channels - upgrading 8 Arches to dumb RGB - 8+ sequences (1+ New)
    2015 - 240 Channels + 8 Universes - sequences TBD
    2016 - No Display
    2017 - Back in the Game - 240 Renard Channels + 12 Universes
    2018 - 256 Renard and 9 Falcon Outputs of Pixels - 16 sequences shown over 2 nights
    2019 - 256 Renard and 9 Falcon Outputs of Pixels - 16 sequences shown over 2 nights
    2020 - Emergency Conversion to Falcon F48 with limited wireless

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Controlling 110 VAC wireframes

    Just for clarity, the F48 supports renard on the board not through the differential receiver.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Controlling 110 VAC wireframes

    Greetings Tom!

    I have not heard of Renard boards, just found another research project!

    Since you confirm an AC controller board will be required, my research will focus on identifying the best type of light strings and AC control board first. I can then work through the best way to control them.

    Thanks for your response and assistance in identifying the problem that need to be solved!

    Dick

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Controlling 110 VAC wireframes

    Greetings Mike!

    Appreciate your response to my question.

    I did not realize the Falcon F48 supports Renard boards directly instead of through the differential receiver board. I am guessing that the Renard boards are controlled by DMX, so any of the three DMX RJ45 jacks may be used to control them.

    Did I get that right?

    Regards,
    Dick

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Controlling 110 VAC wireframes

    Check out the manual for the F48 (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...aCNvvDtgk/edit) page 16 (Section 3.2.3).
    Renard is its own protocol that also uses RS-485.
    Live, Laugh, Love.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Controlling 110 VAC wireframes

    Most "Renard controllers" utilize the "Renard Protocol" for the data protocol and RS485 (some also support RS232) for communication. Most of the renard style controllers and LOR controllers can also run DMX. For the renard controllers to run DMX, you will need to flash the chip with the right firmware. The LOR controllers appear to support DMX out of the box (as well as their own LOR protocol).

    Generically, we refer to AC controllers as Renard controllers. But there is a specific set of data protocols that go along with Renard that specify things like how we know when the packet starts and how to send the byte of data that might otherwise be interpreted as the start byte. DMX has its own mechanism for start of string and then it just sends the data of up to 512 values.
    Last edited by MikeKrebs; 01-19-2021 at 12:58 AM. Reason: more clarity

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Controlling 110 VAC wireframes

    Unless you get them used, Renards are generally available only in kit form. There's currently two main branches of the renard products.

    The SS series are sold by WayneJ here via private message here on the forum. These come in 8, 16, and 24 channel versions. They're all for AC lights and have the SSR integrated into the Renard controllers.

    The Renard-Plus series is sold at www.renard-shop.com. These have a lot more options. They have onboard SSR options like the SS series, as well as versions that support remote SSRs that let you reduce AC cabling into smaller clusters. They also have versions that control DC lights like dumb RGB strips.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Controlling 110 VAC wireframes

    Also worth noting, the LOR controllers, although significantly more expensive, come prebuilt and will run in DMX mode and are easily controlled from Vixen and xLights.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Controlling 110 VAC wireframes

    Thank you for your comment algerdes.
    That's what I get for scanning the manual instead of reading all the details. I am learning that this hobby has a whole lot of details!

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