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Thread: Ethernet cables

  1. #31
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    Default Re: Ethernet cables

    Quote Originally Posted by algerdes View Post
    Thank you. Unfortunately I don't have it in my wiring cross reference chart. :|

    J - Unknown designation (not in any NEC spec book that I have).
    MPR - Multipurpose riser.
    CMR - Communications riser.

    (UL) - Underwriter Listed (I looked, but didn't find it on the UL website.)
    6PR - 6 pair
    24 AWG - American Wire Gauge sized at 24

    The marking of "Backbone 06-02" leads me to believe this cable was used between comm closets.

    028518 "PEET" may actually be 028518 "FEET". We would right down the marked footage at the start of a pull, and then again at the end, telling us how much we pulled out of the box/off the reel for each pull. Subtract the first recording from the last and this information was kept on a sheet so that we knew how long each run was in case we ran into cable length related problems.

    In any case, thanks for the opportunity to dig into one of my "former life" situations.
    Interesting nonetheless lol
    I have tested this stuff in long power runs in pairs meaning a set of twisted wires for v+ and a set for V- and this stuff works very well also made a 30í Ethernet cable and no noticeable diff from my store bought one so I will use it till I have an issue I guess lol.


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  2. #32
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    Default Re: Ethernet cables

    I was under the impression that "Cat5" (as well as "Cat3" and maybe others) was a name of a twisted pair wire cabling specification that most people, myself included, generally and wrongly restricted to 4 pairs. I don't think the spec actually calls out the number of twisted pairs. Kind of like how many pairs are in older Cat3 phone cable? I've seen 3 pairs but RJ-11 phone jacks only support 2 pairs.

    I found a reference in the Wikipedia Category 5 cable entry:
    "Although cable assemblies containing 4 pairs are common, category 5 is not limited to 4 pairs. Backbone applications involve using up to 100 pairs.[34]"
    The footnote says "34. As noted in ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B-2 standard for backbone applications"

    As far as the cable in question, I think you should be able to pick 4 pairs that you can tell apart and terminate them as if it was just 4 pair. Then test with a signal. A continuity based tester may not be good enough. Good luck.

  3. #33
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    Default Re: Ethernet cables

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry-Rigs View Post
    I was under the impression that "Cat5" (as well as "Cat3" and maybe others) was a name of a twisted pair wire cabling specification that most people, myself included, generally and wrongly restricted to 4 pairs. I don't think the spec actually calls out the number of twisted pairs. Kind of like how many pairs are in older Cat3 phone cable? I've seen 3 pairs but RJ-11 phone jacks only support 2 pairs.

    I found a reference in the Wikipedia Category 5 cable entry:
    "Although cable assemblies containing 4 pairs are common, category 5 is not limited to 4 pairs. Backbone applications involve using up to 100 pairs.[34]"
    The footnote says "34. As noted in ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B-2 standard for backbone applications"

    As far as the cable in question, I think you should be able to pick 4 pairs that you can tell apart and terminate them as if it was just 4 pair. Then test with a signal. A continuity based tester may not be good enough. Good luck.
    Thanks thatís pretty much what Iíve done and has worked very well so far no complaints and distances for voltage are great aswell


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  4. #34
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    Default Re: Ethernet cables

    Make sure you stay with the same pattern. Once you do it a couple times it gets easy. I enjoy making my custom CAT6 cables myself now.

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  5. #35
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    Default Re: Ethernet cables

    Category 3, 5, 6 and 7 are all designations of wire size, wire twist rate, and wire association (as in how they are bundled together in one sheath). Usually associated with unshielded twisted pair, it is not necessarily so. The same specs can apply to shielded twisted pair, and/or multi-strand cables, etc. I have (from a prior life) one coil of 40 pair cabling that has a rating of Category 3. Cable was from early digital comm days, used to connect from one communications closet to another. At the time it was "top of the line" stuff.

    My favorite to work with used to be cat5 cable in two pair configuration. Pins 1,2,3 and 6 only when using RJ45 ends. Lightweight, small, and very flexible.
    Live, Laugh, Love.

  6. #36
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    Default Re: Ethernet cables

    I do not have any specific experience or knowledge of the subject cable but thought that maybe it would have been used to bring network connectivity AND phone signals to the work desk location, like in cubicles. Maybe using the punch style combination outlets????
    Kevin

  7. #37
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    Default Re: Ethernet cables

    Backbone cable. Cat3, 5,5e,6 really has nothing to do with how many pairs there are necessarily. You are just used to seeing 4 pairs because it is the most common for the applications you see. Hell, you can get cat5e cable with 100 pairs if you wanted

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