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Thread: Meanwell Power Supply Current Sharing signal

  1. #1
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    Default Meanwell Power Supply Current Sharing signal

    I have an Meanwell RCP-1U enclosure with 3x Meanwell RCP-1000-24's power supplies in it. The power supplies are connected in parallel with each other inside the RCP-1U enclosure, and the RCP-1U sorts everything out to output a single 24V 120A / 2880W line from the 3 power supplies. All good and well.

    Now I want to now another RCP-1U in parallel to the first one with another 3x power supplies in it (You can stack these up to 8000W).

    However, I'm having some questions about wiring the two units up. According to the datasheet here:
    https://www.meanwell.com/productPdf.aspx?i=371

    You need to run a current sharing signal on PIN 14 of the I/O connector that's described as:
    "14 CS - Current sharing signal. When units are connected in parallel, the CS pins of the units should be connected to allow current balance between units"

    However, it's just a single signal wire. There is no common ground between the units. So how would that work? I can't figure out any other value on the datasheet which would make sense for a common ground:
    RCP1U.jpg


    Second question - how do you test the parallel mechanism? I have an Electronic Load, but it's limited to 320W. How would I know if I wired up the parallel signal correctly? Just try and draw 5000W out of it using a bunch of pixels and see what happens?
    2019: ??? pixels, 24 E682's. Centralized 24v power distribution.
    2018: 2000 pixels, 2 E682's. 4 LOR
    2017: 33069 pixels, 20 E682's. 50 A/C with 2 LOR
    ...
    2011: 64 A/C channels with 5 LOR

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Meanwell Power Supply Current Sharing signal

    Hi, I can’t comment on the Meanwell but have run other server type power supplies in parallel up to their maximum without them tripping out.

    In regard to the second part of your question: As all the outputs are connected together by default all the grounds are common and no second connection is needed.

    I have never investigated quite how this all worked but all units seemed to be at about the same temperature when checked with a digital inferred temperature gun and yes that’s how I load tested my set of three – switched one off and loaded the other two up with pixels.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Meanwell Power Supply Current Sharing signal

    That’s a cool setup. There’s a another manual with more details on the connection. I’d guess it’s either use the main V- as the ground ref or the connector shell. But usually it’s spec’d if the shell should be connected. Here’s the manual: https://produktinfo.conrad.com/daten...R_RCP_1000.pdf

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Meanwell Power Supply Current Sharing signal

    I have 3 of the Meanwell RSP3000-12 running in parallel. Been a few years since I did it. This looks a little different than the RSP line. As far as testing if the current sharing worked I just turned on 10k+ pixels at 100% intensity white. It worked lol

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Meanwell Power Supply Current Sharing signal

    Quote Originally Posted by piense View Post
    That’s a cool setup. There’s a another manual with more details on the connection. I’d guess it’s either use the main V- as the ground ref or the connector shell. But usually it’s spec’d if the shell should be connected. Here’s the manual: https://produktinfo.conrad.com/daten...R_RCP_1000.pdf
    Yeah, they're cool power supplies. Next year I want to hook their I2C lines up to an Arduino or RPi and provide remote voltage/current/temp monitor on them as well. And even have a hot spare. Not this year though...


    But thanks! Figured there'd be a better manual, but couldn't find it.

    That has the missing piece of info I needed. Effectively when sharing current, you HAVE to connect +S/-S to the load and you can't just connect it to the local sense -V/+V. In that configuration, S- is probably used as the negative side of CS.

    Ok, now it makes sense how this whole contraption works. Thanks!


    So plan is now to connect a shared +S to my DC breaker box (DST-20A), shared -S to my ground bar, and then connect CS's together.
    2019: ??? pixels, 24 E682's. Centralized 24v power distribution.
    2018: 2000 pixels, 2 E682's. 4 LOR
    2017: 33069 pixels, 20 E682's. 50 A/C with 2 LOR
    ...
    2011: 64 A/C channels with 5 LOR

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