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Thread: Correct way to wire Power Supplies

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Correct way to wire Power Supplies

    To get back to the OP's request, try it for yourself. Connect your lights up to the power supply (and controllers). Measure with lights off. Turn all lights on full power. Measure with lights on. You can then see how much draw is constant (lights off) and how much it draws if you should turn it all on full. This will tell you how many power supplies you can connect to the same 120 vac line.

    FYI - Note that measuring with the lights off is sometimes an eye-opener. Pixels draw power at all times, or more accurately - the control chips driving the pixels draw power at all times.

    Just a note, not to be taken as a directive ... Some of us never turn our lights up beyond a certain percentage. This means we have a lot more "head room" when it comes to power input vs power consumption. So, if I should tell you we load up to 10 power supplies on a single 20 amp 120 ac circuit - don't take it as gospel that you can do the same. We can because we know how we use the stuff. Your usage might, and probably will, be much different.
    Last edited by algerdes; 03-15-2019 at 07:11 PM.
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  2. #12
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    Default Re: Correct way to wire Power Supplies

    Quote Originally Posted by algerdes View Post
    To get back to the OP's request, try it for yourself. Connect your lights up to the power supply (and controllers). Measure with lights off. Turn all lights on full power. Measure with lights on. You can then see how much draw is constant (lights off) and how much it draws if you should turn it all on full. This will tell you how many power supplies you can connect to the same 120 vac line.

    FYI - Note that measuring with the lights off is sometimes an eye-opener. Pixels draw power at all times, or more accurately - the control chips driving the pixels draw power at all times.
    Will do! Thanks for all the info

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Correct way to wire Power Supplies

    Sorry, I was editing at the same time you were replying.
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  4. #14
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    Default Re: Correct way to wire Power Supplies

    Quote Originally Posted by cjrobin27 View Post
    Would it be as simple as using a jumper wire from the neutral and hot on one PS to the nuetral and hot on the next PS?
    Yes. That is what I do for my 12V, 360W power supplies. For a power supply rated at 360W, the 120VAC amps should be 3A not including any conversion losses. You should be able to safely use most 14AWG wire for internal wiring and either 12AWG or 14AWG extension cords (depends on length of extension cord).
    Kevin

    2017 - Pi3 w/FPP controlling 8 ESPixelsticks driving 1250pixels and 3 Arduino MEGAS communicating with ESP-01s driving 96 channels
    2016 - 184 channels of Blinking/Flashing using 4 Arduino MEGAs and cheap home-made props.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Correct way to wire Power Supplies

    I used 750 watt 62.5 amps server supplies last year. First time using them and I love them. I run my lights at 25% so there's more than enough power available. If I recall, one is running 1,350 pixels, another running 1,700 pixels and another running 1,420 pixels.

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  6. #16
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    Default Re: Correct way to wire Power Supplies

    Quote Originally Posted by MartinMueller2003 View Post
    Depends on the wire guage you use. 15A uses 14 AWG wire. That is a bit thick to be putting two wires under a terminal. With a terminal block you still use 14 AWG to each of the PSUs but the block is designed to have the terminals ganged. Four terminals can drive three PSUs using the 15A jumper strips.
    I never connect the wire directly to the psu for this ver reason. I tried hampering off 1 psu to another, to dang bulky, so I now use blade connectors.

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