Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: Completely Dead to Death Pixels/Matrix

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like

    Unhappy Completely Dead to Death Pixels/Matrix

    THE QUESTION: outside of obviously burned to death Christmas light pixels, can I test 12V 12mm led pixels with ws2811 chips by the strand instead of having to cut each pixel out individually?

    THE STORY: I spent 20 years last October - November building a 12V 8,000 led pixel matrix testing every 12mm 100 pixel strand as I went along. I used 400W power supplies and inserted at the beginning/end of each strand. Tested perfectly. I cut 6 foot 2 wire extension cords in half and use the male end for the strings and attach the female end to bring the juice from the PSU. After I finished a little showing off using X-Lights to prove it was awesome, I puffed out my chest and left it a few days basking in my glory. Two days later my son wanted to show it to his friends but didn't understand the male plugs were supposed to connect to the PSUs and plugged them directly into the wall. I came running when I smelled the smoke and unplugged the power strips as quickly as I could, but it was too late. My son is devastated and I love him for being proud, all the help he gave me building this thing, and just being a really great kid. In fact, I erroneously thought someone else made the mistake but that's an even longer story.

    THE RESULTS: Several strings weren't connected and are fine. Others flicker, maybe one or two randomly spaced pixels light on a strand with no apparent consistency, some will come to life if I cut pixels out, etc, etc., but I can find no way to locate good and bad pixels without chopping the stands up, sometimes down to one pixel at a time. I'm getting the 12V at the end and random pixels light and random pixels don't when connected to the controller.

    THOUGHTS: Would it be possible to connect just the data cable to my Falcon V3 controller and run the pixels in front of a small store bought Tesla coil to identify the good ones? I've tried visual inspection and can weed out the obvious ones, but nothing else I do other than cutting and testing them one at a time seems to work consistently and I'm burning through fuses.

    FINAL: I very much want to turn this into a more positive result more for my son than anything else. If I had to, I guess I have the time to test thousands of pixels one at a time, but I also would like to learn. I've seen others who have similar problems on a thankfully smaller scale and to date have not found any solution.

    APPRECIATION: If you have any suggestions you can bet the farm I would be extremely grateful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    404
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Completely Dead to Death Pixels/Matrix

    You used a regular AC plug for a low-voltage connection?

    I think this is the third time Iíve heard this occurring.

  3. Thanks samstone thanked for this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Sebring, FL
    Posts
    84
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Completely Dead to Death Pixels/Matrix

    If it was Facebook, I would give you the sad crying emoji. Guess this will have to do....

    I'm sorry I don't have any experiential news to help. 8,000 pixels... I'd love to see a video from when you were pounding your chest and had it working!

  5. Thanks samstone thanked for this post
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Hudson MA
    Posts
    3,792
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Completely Dead to Death Pixels/Matrix

    If the wires are not melted then there is a way. Still not fun but...

    1. Get your WS2811 data source (your F16 in a test mode will be fine) running and sending out a pattern. Almost any pattern that you can recognize as being "what you are looking for" will work. Lots of blinking and flashing is a bad idea.
    2. Optional (but desired): Connect a pixel data buffer (aka null pixel without a pixel) to the data source. Also known as a uAmp and a few other names. Any of the pixel data buffers will do. This buffer is in place to protect your data source from damage as you do the steps below.
    3. Take a 50cm length of stranded wire and solder a sturdy needle to it. Tape it to a set of pliers.
    4. Verify the data pattern using a working string of pixels.
    5. Disconnect your working string.
    6. Hook up your broken strings power (not the data line) to the pixel buffer.
    7. Connect the free end of the needle wire to the data line output on the pixel data buffer.
    8. Starting at the beginning of the string, use the needle to poke into the data line between pixels.
      1. If you accidentally poke the V+ or V- lines you might destroy the buffer (most likely not, but it is possible).
      2. The buffer output (including the ones on the F16) do NOT like to have the strings connected and disconnected while they are generating a signal. On occasion there is enough of a data reflection to damage the output driver. Pushing the needle into and removing it from the data wire is exactly what they do not like.
      3. Recheck that the output of the buffer is working using the known working string every once and a while just to be sure the buffer has not been damaged.

    9. Repeat steps 4-8 at various points in the string to locate the pixels that work and those that don't work.


    A few comments.


    • You can jump forward and backward more than one pixel as you are looking for sections that may be working.
    • I personally would throw the affected strings away. IMO, if you found any pixels that had survived, they have still been damaged. they will most likely not last long.
    Last edited by MartinMueller2003; 02-17-2019 at 03:45 PM.


    2019 - Just moved into a new home (yet another change of plans). Will be dim but not dark. Too much to do at the new place to leave time for a show.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyX...ttrsZNARkUce0Q

  7. Thanks samstone thanked for this post
    Likes samstone liked this post
  8. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Ashburn, VA
    Posts
    395
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Completely Dead to Death Pixels/Matrix

    I am truly sorry for the problems you are enduring.

    Quote Originally Posted by TooCleverForMyOwnGood
    "I'll just use AC plugs for 12v. I will know better than to plug it in the wall."
    The person who knows may not be the person who does.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bwinter View Post
    You used a regular AC plug for a low-voltage connection?

    I think this is the third time Iíve heard this occurring.
    ... in as many months.

  9. Thanks samstone thanked for this post
  10. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Completely Dead to Death Pixels/Matrix

    I'm far from knowledgeable in advanced electronics, but this has been a hobby of mine for more than 20 years. Thank you for pointing out that I made an error thinking it was an improvement. I will own and thanks to you will learn from this mistake.

  11. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Ashburn, VA
    Posts
    395
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Completely Dead to Death Pixels/Matrix

    Anybody can deal with success. It takes a lot to deal with failure.

    In my job, I sometimes interview job applicants. One of my standard questions is "Tell me a war story, something you are proud of. Something you did that directly led to the success of the project." Everybody has that story and some of them make the applicant sound like all the Marvel heroes combined into one. Great.

    Then I ask my next question: "Tell me another war story, one where you screwed up. One where you were personally responsible for a big problem on some project." In order to give them time to decide how to answer, I tell one of mine (and I have plenty). The point of the question is not have they made mistakes. the point is the follow-up of "What did you learn, and how did you recover from your mistake?"

    I had one guy who never gave me the chance for the follow-up. He looked at me with a straight face and said "I've never screwed up."
    After making sure he was serious, I marked his paperwork as DNH (Do Not Hire). If somebody says they have never screwed up, they are either lying, or don't know enough to realize they screwed up. Either way, DNH.

  12. Thanks samstone thanked for this post
    Likes samstone liked this post
  13. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Completely Dead to Death Pixels/Matrix

    Turns out I'm not as clever as I hoped.

  14. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Completely Dead to Death Pixels/Matrix

    Apparently I'm a dork. Thanks for reminding me.

  15. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Completely Dead to Death Pixels/Matrix

    This is all quite correct, but thank you very much for your obvious altruistic empathy. I was blessed with an incredible career that over time evolved into assisting corporations with start ups or mergers and acquisitions and the last 20 years of my career before I had a stroke, I owned home health and hospice agencies. Some of these nurses and caregivers are among the most incredible people to ever live. In fact, most of the ones I was fortunate enough to work with embodied every positive characteristic imaginable, especially the ones working with hospice patients, but for some reason they still weren't cut out for working with patients they sincerely cared about. I developed what I called a critical thinking assessment where I presented applicants with some highly specific situations (ex: what would you do if your patient was in unbearable pain, but the son/daughter/power of attorney representative irrefutably refused the use of pain meds). The best applicants would detail a method that would hopefully resolve the issue and get the patient the needed meds. HOWEVER, some of the most dedicated, genuinely empathetic and sympathetic applicants would "strangle, maim, or otherwise force" the the family member to get what was necessary or even resort to unethical or illegal action because undeniably it truly was in the best interest of the patient. Their heart was certainly in the right place, but they were not hireable. Variations of my critical thinking concept are now common across the country with hospices, and no one will ever know where it began but God blessed me with the opportunity to serve more people than I will ever know, including a bit of side-counseling the good hearted nurses who needed a better direction.

    Thank you again for the concern in your tone and sharing your experiences.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •