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Thread: Power output comparison Meanwell vs. cheaper alternatives

  1. #1
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    Default Power output comparison Meanwell vs. cheaper alternatives

    Has anybody compared the difference in outputs between Meanwell and cheaper power supplies? I am curious about the quality of the AC to DC conversion and how much noise may be present on the output. If I had an oscilloscope, I'd check myself but I don't. I seem to be having EMI issues I didn't have before and was wondering how much power supplies might be contributing.
    Ed
    Happily retired

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Power output comparison Meanwell vs. cheaper alternatives

    What model number are you using? Did the issues start with the introduction of the Meanwell PSD?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Power output comparison Meanwell vs. cheaper alternatives

    Quote Originally Posted by shm267 View Post
    What model number are you using? Did the issues start with the introduction of the Meanwell PSD?
    I have one Meanwell LRS-350-5 and 5 cheaper knockoffs. It's the knockoffs I'm worried about. I blew one right as I setup this year and wondering if the others might be causing some noise as they age. The Meanwell is currently in a standalone matrix panel setup and remote from the others so I don't believe it's an issue. Just wondering if I should plan on upgrading all the others to Meanwell as part of my plans next year.
    Ed
    Happily retired

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Power output comparison Meanwell vs. cheaper alternatives

    I assume meanwells are a standard in the industry. I use them at work and most perform well, including the closed and open frames. The ones I have issues with are the desktop power supplies (walwart almost), and they go bad after a year or two of continuous use.
    Having said that, I have the cheaper ones in my yard (from DIYledexpress) that I have had for 6 years and never had to replace one.
    So i guess it is what you feel comfortable with. I think MrSmoofy is having a presale right now, and he has good prices.
    That's a feature not a bug.
    There's no charge for that.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Power output comparison Meanwell vs. cheaper alternatives

    My experience with power supplies from the CHEAP CHEAP to high end Cosel, Meanwell and a few others ...

    I had a cheap 12v 30A ... worked 3+ years 24/7 until about 6 months ago. The ONE problem I had was keep an eye on the fan. I had to take it apart maybe every 6 months and oil the bearings. The fan had the cheap bronze sleeve, not bearings.

    NOTE: After about a year, the output filters started taking a crap. Voltage would not stabilize between .5A and 2A ... I had a 100,000uf cap bank I tossed inline and that cleared that problem right up.

    I must have missed "AN OIL CHANGE" and one day came to realize it was **HOT**. Swapped it for another backup unit ... let it cool down, put a NEW fan in and "NADA".

    I bought a replacement labeled as an "LED POWER SUPPLY" - it lasted a week under the same conditions.

    My take on it is quality costs a bit more - definitely worth the headaches. You could get 50 power supplies and use them 24/7 for a few years and have no failures. **OR** you could get those same 50 units and have a 50% failure rate in a month.

    Paying a bit more for brands that have good longevity records? Depends on the duty cycle, manufacturer quality control, etc.

    Overall - even the best of the best suffer failures, albeit not nearly as often.

    Internally - majority of Switching Power Supplies are relatively quiet. There are some inexpensive USB oscilloscopes that are usually pretty good at showing any noise in the DC output. If you are really thinking there is noise leaking from the power supplies, 35,000uf @ 35v. If you live down south, get the 105c model, it will tolerate the high temperatures longer.

    One other thing to look for is either the UL or CSA labels. Simply means the unit in question was tested by a laboratory. These power supplies will cost more due to the testing - it is an added manufacturer cost and is passed down to the consumer. It is no guarantee it will work better or longer - the labs test for allot of stuff we do not consider. Then the manufacturer produces these power supplies within the specs - increased quality control means dependable units.

    It is a bit long but I think you get the idea.

    Enjoy the light!
    -Eddie

    The missus wants to ride!

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