Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: WS2801 vs. WS2811

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Indiana, USA
    Posts
    223
    Post Thanks / Like

    Question WS2801 vs. WS2811

    Just read today about the transition from WS2801 to WS2811. Aside from being a little less expensive (yay!), will there be any performance or programming differences? Will I be able to commingle the 2801 and 2811 pixels on the same controller without problems and without the audience telling the difference? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Sheboygan, WI
    Posts
    1,632
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: WS2801 vs. WS2811

    The dimming properties are the same on both chips. The WS2811 uses 3 wire as opposed to the 4 of the 2801. My manufacturer has told me the WS2811 is also more "stable", but I have yet to have a problem with the WS2801 chips.

    You should be able to comingle the strings. How you configure your controller for that depends on the controller. If using an e68X you would have to put the WS2811 on different universes than the WS2801. Also, you'll have to check the firmware version of your e68x. There was a firmware update which added functionality for the WS2811 IC.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,171
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: WS2801 vs. WS2811

    The WS2811s use timing very similar to the 1804s. With the most recent firmware of the E68x controllers, select 1804 (fast) as the chip type.
    The Sandevices E680/E681/E682 Pixel Controllers, part of the PIXEL PROJECT
    www.sandevices.com
    <-email jim at

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: WS2801 vs. WS2811

    I know this is an old thread, but I'm new to the DIY Christmas forum, and just finding my way around.

    One more advantage - if anyone is still considering whether to use 3-wire (WS2811 etc.) vs 4-wire (WS2801 and others) is that if you are doing something custom (like I am, using Cypress PSoC controllers), the 3-wire only needs one GPIO port on your SoC chip, instead of two (one for data, one for clock). I'm designing an LED-string rig to attach to guy wires of a radio tower, and each LED-String will be controlled separately.

    I'm acquiring waterproof LED strings (50 per string) and plan to connect two strings together (for 100 per guy wire)... so separate strings is also driven by power requirements. I plan to have six 100-LED strings (one each on 6 guy wires) for my "proof of concept" demo.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •