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View Full Version : Using 595 board to manually control lights w/o computer?



jstlucas
01-05-2009, 04:20 PM
Ok, my neighbor wants to dig trenches, run conduit and lights, etc, so that I can control all of his lights next Christmas. But he also wants to be able to control any light outlets (flood lights for his trees) manually w/o a computer in the meantime, so I was looking at the coop version of the 595 board trying to figure out how to do this at the controller box.

Since the +5V and Grd lines go to multiple spots, neither can be cut in one spot without having an effect of the rest of the board. My first thought was to disable the 595 tri-state output and then hold the appropriate pin high to trip the 2803, but that line is permanently wired low and connected to the ground pin under each 595.

After playing with things, I pulled the 595 +5V (pin 16) from the socket that it's in, then ran a 180 ohm resistor from +5V to the 595 output pin through a switch. This was working yesterday for the 8 channels on one chip for hours w/o anything getting hot. Then when it's Christmas time for the display, I'd reconnect the +5V line to the 595.

Is there anything inherently wrong with the above method? Granted it's a lot of wiring changes for controlling a small number of channels, but I didn't want to build another box with a power supply and a bunch of ethernet jacks for this purpose. Or if there's something else I could try, what would that be?

Trip
01-05-2009, 04:23 PM
just buy a bunch of switches, lol

XmasInGalt
01-05-2009, 04:45 PM
One possible solution is to use X10 devices for the flood lights. During Christmas time, you could remove or bypass the X10 device and connect to a controller / SSR. I use X10 devices for most of my indoor and ourdoor lighting.

TERBObob
01-05-2009, 06:25 PM
If you want to use a PC to control it .. why not use a KIT74 instead for those 8 channels that way , you can still leave the 595 connected also :)

phenagan
01-05-2009, 07:01 PM
Use "three way" switches... Wire the light to the center (common), then one switched connection to the SSR and the other to supply. In the SSR postion, the light is under PC control, which is off until you're running the display. In the other position, the light is on.

awhaley
01-06-2009, 06:18 AM
I'm not sure I really understand what you're needing... are you saying he wants to have control of his lawn lights from now until november, when you'll run them completely, or that during the christmas season he needs to be able to turn them on occasionally when your show isn't running?

If we're talking about a year round solution, then I'd wire up a second power circuit with a switch for the lights and just swap them over at christmas time (Or run them in parallel...)

If we're talking about a 'no swapping plugs' solution during the christmas season...

To trigger the SSRs, you connect the pin to ground... so you could add switches that bring these outputs to ground between the ssrs and the grinch... OR.... the obvious way would be to leave the channels on on the grinch and ssr permanently and let him use inline switches to turn the lights OFF.

kostyun
01-08-2009, 05:48 PM
I think the 3 position switch is a pretty good idea!

jstlucas
01-12-2009, 12:23 AM
I'm not sure I really understand what you're needing... are you saying he wants to have control of his lawn lights from now until november, when you'll run them completely, or that during the christmas season he needs to be able to turn them on occasionally when your show isn't running?

If we're talking about a year round solution, then I'd wire up a second power circuit with a switch for the lights and just swap them over at christmas time (Or run them in parallel...)

If we're talking about a 'no swapping plugs' solution during the christmas season...

To trigger the SSRs, you connect the pin to ground... so you could add switches that bring these outputs to ground between the ssrs and the grinch... OR.... the obvious way would be to leave the channels on on the grinch and ssr permanently and let him use inline switches to turn the lights OFF.

The first, really, he wants to be able to control his lights until I get around to controlling them at Christmas. The more I think about this, the more I think that just building another
small board w. sockets and switches and no ic's will be easier than anything else. The thing already runs off a +5V supply and I can plug that into the new box. Thanks for the ideas.