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kmc123
02-14-2008, 11:39 PM
I just saw another post that made me wonder - For those of you who have variable temperature soldering irons, what temperature (Degrees Farenheight) do you use?

omzig
02-15-2008, 12:37 AM
For most PCB work with 60/40 solder, I use 340°C, which would be 644°F.

mrpackethead
02-15-2008, 01:35 AM
I just saw another post that made me wonder - For those of you who have variable temperature soldering irons, what temperature (Degrees Farenheight) do you use?

325 degrees C here.. seems to be fine.. Melt point of solder is about 270 i think

Trepidati0n
02-15-2008, 10:28 AM
Depends upon the application...but 325 to 350 (I just get the dial somewhere in the area of need). I only go higher if h'm trying to solder something with significant thermal masses.

omzig
02-15-2008, 11:18 AM
Melt point of solder is about 270 i thinkActually I think it melts much lower than that. I seem to remember 60/40 being in the upper 180's and 63/37 in the lower 180's. Lead-free solders are somewhere around 215°C.

The thing is though, you'll actually burn up less components using a little higher temperature (within reason) than a lower one because you can solder quicker and apply the heat to the components for less time. I used to work for this old guy that solders boards all day long. I would only occasionally do some soldering, and he used to always yell at me for taking too long per joint. He always used to say that it should only take a few seconds per joint.

If you have never tried 63/37 solder, do it. IMHO it solders a little easier. I think that it's better because it goes from solid to liquid (and vice-versa) quicker than 60/40. With 60/40 there is a short period where it is kind of in-between states. If I didn't have a large supply of 60/40, I'd be using it.

scharbon
02-15-2008, 11:44 PM
I set mine at about 600 degrees F. It makes for much faster and better joints. You get a nice shiny dallop of solder and your work much faster - especially around the triacs. I was working at the 425 degree range when I first started because I was afraid I would burn my components - then I realized I had bad (cold) joints - so I cranked it up and have had good results since. Hope this helps.

Steve

Virtus
03-21-2008, 02:45 PM
I used to work for this old guy that solders boards all day long. I would only occasionally do some soldering, and he used to always yell at me for taking too long per joint. He always used to say that it should only take a few seconds per joint.

Good advice almost always comes from these types of sources.

Aurbo99
03-21-2008, 08:05 PM
I'm using a Weller WES51,

I've never taken it off "55" (Fx10) 550F.

Never had an issue yet, but I've also been soldering for 30+years now.

I guess I'm due.. :rolleyes: