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ikabod
01-07-2008, 12:11 PM
I'm not able to grab "green" lights from the store so I'm thinking about making my "clear" lights into "green" by using transparent glass paint. Anyone tried this?

Macrosill
01-07-2008, 12:22 PM
It has been done b4 thought I am not sure it has been specifically talked about here. Please report back so others can see how it went. Pictures are always a nice touch too.

daviddth
01-07-2008, 01:37 PM
I have done it with glass paint but it was a failure. I think success has a lot to do with what paint you use.

I initially used a cheaper one off ebay that is supposed to be waterproof once it dried, but within a week of putting a test set of lights outside they had faded a lot. They started red and ended up a light pink. After one or two light rains they had faded further and were almost clear again.

I went to a local hobby shop and got red glass paint designed for staining glass windows, and it was a lot better. The colors stayed brighter, but the paint chipped off easy as anything, so the action of the lights hitting the shed in light wind reduced the coverage from really good to nothing in a week.

I then tried model paint (enamel) thinned down and sprayed on with an airbrush and this was the way I ended up doing my 1200 or so red lights. The paint took a few days to dry, but it did not chip, flake or fade at all. The lights were up for close to 6 weeks, we had highs of 38c, strong winds that threw the icicles onto the roof quite a few times, as well as about 90mm of rain, and other than a few damaged lights, most survived the display without issue at all.

Walden
01-07-2008, 02:21 PM
How did you go about isolating the spray of the paint so it just hits the bulb? Or did you just spray everything

daviddth
01-07-2008, 03:00 PM
well..... what I ended up doing (After I'd sprayed the initial lights) was simply cut a circle of plastic, put a slot in the side where the bulb could be slid in/out, and then slid the bulb in, holding it below the plastic and sprayed with the airbrush.

This almost eliminated the overspray onto the base of the lamp, but the trick was to mount the plastic - I clipped it onto a bit of wood with enough room to put my hand below it, insert the bulb, spray, turn 90 deg, spray, turn again etc until the bulb was covered, then slide the bulb along the slot to remove it.

Having the airbrush set up was the hardest bit, because I was spraying oil paint, I thinned it down with about 2 parts thinner, 1 part paint, dropped the pressure using the regulator until I found a happy medium with pressure & coverage.

My initial lights were just done with some overspray onto the base as I did not expect them to last the season & be used again in 2008 - they are 8 years old after all, but they lasted and will get yet another run in the 2008 season.

The next sets I paint will use the slotted plastic as it gets good coverage and very little spray onto the base.

Toaster
01-15-2008, 12:05 AM
So you successfully used enamel model paint - thinned (I'm guessing with standard paint thinner?) to what? a water like consistency? sprayed the bulb, let dry a couple days you said? and they were good to go?

Frankz
01-15-2008, 12:44 AM
Has anyone ever tried PlastiDip?
http://www.plastidip.com/home_solutions/Plasti_Dip

Straight, it would probably be too thick, but it can be thinned.
Would have to experiment with different thicknesses, to see how well it would work.
Black should work good to blackout unwanted bulbs from showing.
Home Depot, Lowes, Ace Hardware, Menards,....
http://www.plastidip.com/diy_where_to_buy.php


and then there's always color caps:
http://www.christmaslightshow.com/xcart/home.php?cat=4
not cheap, tho.

.

omzig
01-15-2008, 02:03 AM
and then there's always color caps:.Is there such a thing available as black or opaque caps for those few unwanted lights at the end of a string? I have used black paint for this, but it's pretty much permanent.

Slush
01-15-2008, 02:10 AM
Has anybody tried fingernail polish?

Frankz
01-15-2008, 09:33 AM
Is there such a thing available as black or opaque caps for those few unwanted lights at the end of a string? I have used black paint for this, but it's pretty much permanent.
Yes, they're called Blackout Caps, on that link with the color caps, but they seem to be all out of stock.

ppohlman
01-15-2008, 01:48 PM
Is there such a thing available as black or opaque caps for those few unwanted lights at the end of a string? I have used black paint for this, but it's pretty much permanent.

You can always use black electrical tape. That's what I have done in the past.

omzig
01-15-2008, 02:11 PM
Yeah I used tape on a few strings last year too. I guess I'm looking for something that's real quick to put on and remove. Maybe I should get some cheaper electrical tape, because I ended up just replacing the bulbs when I tore down this year, instead of trying to peel the tape off.

This morning I saw a post where someone (think it was Shocker) mentioned using heat shrink tubing. This sounds like it might work good and I've got miles of the stuff somewhere.

skygodtj
01-20-2008, 10:08 PM
Elec tape gets too sticky, heat shrink tubing would work the easiest, find one that fits snug, slide it on, then plug in the lights, the heat from the bulb will shrink the tubing. Could always keep a couple burned out bulbs and put them in the places you dont want lit lights.

TJ

blurp
01-20-2008, 11:13 PM
Elec tape gets too sticky, heat shrink tubing would work the easiest, find one that fits snug, slide it on, then plug in the lights, the heat from the bulb will shrink the tubing. Could always keep a couple burned out bulbs and put them in the places you dont want lit lights.

TJ

The heat shrink tubing is a good idea, but the burned out bulbs will make the others burn out faster.

skygodtj
01-21-2008, 12:04 AM
Would depend on how many you want to be out/substitute for burned out ones.. a couple wont change much... more than 4-5 would make the others shoulder more volts..

tommy
02-28-2008, 11:30 PM
Just wondering....

Perhaps a transparent green laquer might work. Or you might try looking on the Roscoe lighting site. I know at one time, they made a bulb dye for use on bulbs in stage lighting fixtures. But, if I'm not mistaken, it's pretty expensive.

Just a thought...

Tommy

ctmal
03-05-2008, 01:23 AM
Not sure if this will help.
http://www.christmas-lights-online.com/prodinfo.asp?number=MLC%2D%2D50%2DGREEN%2FGREEN

christmasdisplays.co.nz
03-07-2008, 06:47 AM
Yea done this And I've come up with 2 methods that work. I'm still using sets that are 3 displays old and they look like new,

I found some colours required 2 coats and some 1.

For me - Red and green required one coat. When dried I also applied a coat of clear. I believe this is the secret to them lasting so long.

Blue, pink and purple required 2 coats of colour. I didn't dip them in clear coat, (I couldn't be bothered). These are 1 season old but they didn't fade in our hot hot summer.

I just used glass paint, the kind people use to paint windows and wine glasses etc.

I hope this helps.

wvengineer
01-02-2009, 03:46 PM
i haven't used this stuff in years but back in my stage and theatre days this was the stuff to make custom colored bulbs.. one pint can go a long way...

make sure you use a vapor mask I remember this stuff

http://www.rosco.com/us/scenic/colorine.asp


here is one site...
http://www.stagespot.com/product/ROSPNT-COLORINE/Rosco%20Paint%20-%20Colorine?gclid=CPfNrP_R8JcCFQu-GgodkVhxDw