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angus40
03-23-2012, 07:03 PM
Suggestions on purchasing and best method of using would be appreciated .

kingofkya
03-23-2012, 07:26 PM
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=105&cp_id=10509&cs_id=1050901&p_id=3347&seq=1&format=2

Get a ratchet type on Or your hands will start hurt very quickly.

Which is why i buy premade now a days :)
http://www.monoprice.com/products/subdepartment.asp?c_id=105&cp_id=10208

angus40
03-23-2012, 07:29 PM
Thanks for the quick reply
I intend on buying 1 tomorow , would you have any advice as to cutting and aligning the cat 5 to get pro results

Materdaddy
03-23-2012, 08:51 PM
Thanks for the quick reply
I intend on buying 1 tomorow , would you have any advice as to cutting and aligning the cat 5 to get pro results

Practice.

After making a few hundred ends, you know how to align them and cut them easily.

My method:

Strip about 2" of outer sheathing off, align colors (orange, green, blue, brown) (Too long and you've got a lot more length to untwist, too short, it will be harder to line up the color scheme)
Untwist the pairs and set up the proper scheme (I use 568B) so: orange white, orange, green white, blue, blue white, green, brown white, brown
Get them all aligned for the first 1" of unsheathed length.
Snip them to about 3/4"
Slide into the connector
Double check that the wires stayed in the correct order after cutting and insertion
Crimp

Traneman
03-23-2012, 09:00 PM
Here is my method,
I strip the outer jacket about 2 or 2.5 inches.
Straightene all 8 wires and group them how you want ( but I would suggest keeping the common grouping which can be found doing a search) and then flatten them out using your index finger and thumb.
Still holding the wires in your index finger and thumb I cut all 8 wires about 1/2" long from the outer jacket.
Slide on the connector and then crimp.

Also I would suggest a cable tester, I got mine at Home Depot.

Hope this helps

tfischer
03-23-2012, 09:27 PM
+1 on the "just buy premade" for your main runs. You can hardly make them for as cheap as you can buy them at monoprice, and they'll be more durable.

I do keep a crimper and ends handy for repairs, special cables, and unusual lengths...

morelights
03-23-2012, 11:25 PM
Suggestions on purchasing and best method of using would be appreciated .

I use the Phillips crimper from Lowes and I bought my ends and tester at micro center. I like using the philips crimper from Lowes.

Lionking_Tx
03-23-2012, 11:31 PM
I use an AMP crimp tool for over 10 years now - a bit more expensive, but well worth the money.

http://www.specialized.net/Specialized/22316521-Tyco-AMP-RJ45-Crimp-Tool-8Pos-Modular-Plug-Die-Set-2010.aspx

Lefserev
03-24-2012, 12:19 AM
I bought an Ideal Ratchet Telemaster on eBay for about $15. I think they are normally $80+.
It works well. Ratcheting is very nice, it makes sure that I crimp my connections tight enough.

For stripping, I use the blade on the crimper and untwist the wires. Then I slip them into the connector and crimp it. It's easy after 200 crimps. :biggrin:

Reddy_Kilowatt
03-24-2012, 12:31 AM
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=105&cp_id=10509&cs_id=1050901&p_id=3347&seq=1&format=2

Get a ratchet type on Or your hands will start hurt very quickly.

Which is why i buy premade now a days :)
http://www.monoprice.com/products/subdepartment.asp?c_id=105&cp_id=10208

+1 on Monoprice.

I went through 4 brands crimpers to get a good one. Two were from ebay. 50% of the crimps were bad on pin 1.
The next was a Paladin that I bought at Menards. It had bad crimps on pin 8. So .. it wasn't just how I was holding my mouth.:blink:

I bought the 8 pin only version of the above Monoprice crimper. It was half the price of the Paladin and made consistently good crimps.

http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=105&cp_id=10509&cs_id=1050901&p_id=3352&seq=1&format=2

Their ends work great too...

http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=105&cp_id=10513&cs_id=1051305&p_id=7245&seq=1&format=2

-Craig

THurrle
03-24-2012, 07:44 AM
Suggestions on purchasing and best method of using would be appreciated .
I bought one like this and it has worked well. Youget the tool and the much needed tester.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/RJ45-RJ11-Cat5-LAN-Network-Cable-Tester-Crimper-Plug-/330706107156?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4cff9ebb14

11Bravo
05-08-2013, 01:09 AM
Are boots necessary on the RJ45 plug?

budude
05-08-2013, 01:23 AM
Are boots necessary on the RJ45 plug?

It depends... They're never necessary - but a good option if you will be pulling cables around on the ground and may catch the latch on something and break them. Other than that - no - it makes it harder to run them in/out of the enclosures and makes it little harder to unplug the cables - really you'll be cussing at them in no time at all...

mrpackethead
05-08-2013, 02:10 AM
I rarely would crimp a RJ45 cable, they are so cheap to buy that you really dont' ever need to.. The only time we do, is when we have to make cables using specific cable..

Wayne J
05-08-2013, 09:48 AM
It depends... They're never necessary - but a good option if you will be pulling cables around on the ground and may catch the latch on something and break them. Other than that - no - it makes it harder to run them in/out of the enclosures and makes it little harder to unplug the cables - really you'll be cussing at them in no time at all...

+1
I have a bag of them on the shelf. I made a few cables with them a few years ago and when I put them to use I found they were more of a pain than they were worth. Save your money and spend it elsewhere.

As for 'dragging' the cables.... I keep a bunch of the thick sandwich handy and when I am rolling up my cables, I will put the end that will be dragging across the grass in a baggy, secure it with tape or a zip tie and roll it up, no snags.

11Bravo
05-08-2013, 11:26 PM
Thanks for the tips,

I guess It would be best for me to find a central location for the Ren 48LSD and measure where I'm going to place the DIYC floods before I make any cable and connector purchases. 1 48LSD and 5 floods shouldn't be too difficult. I can set it in the middle of the front porch and run cables left and right to the floods, Probably no more than 35 feet to the fartherest flood. This setup is the only place I'll be using cat5

mikentn
05-10-2013, 09:41 PM
Another idea that might come in handy, especially with the Ren48LSD. I made short cat5 extensions that have an RJ45 plug on one end, and a RJ45 keystone jack on the other, and extend the Ren48 LSD jacks down below the foam rubber gasket in the bottom of the CG1500. This way, I don't have to keep pushing and pulling the plugs on the ends of my long cat5 runs through that gasket (which has a nasty habit of grabbing the locking tab on the plug since I don't use boots). I've actually done this on all of my boards that I have to attach cat5 to.

11Bravo
05-11-2013, 12:16 AM
What do you do about keeping them from getting wet?

mikentn
05-11-2013, 12:53 AM
What do you do about keeping them from getting wet?

I wrap the back of the keystone Jack and two - three inches of cat5 with rubber splicing tape. Seals it up really good.

Hitting you up from somewhere in the ether

11Bravo
05-12-2013, 02:23 PM
I didn't know what RJ45 Keystone jack was until you posted it. Now I've been looking on ebay to buy some. Probably a dozen to start with.

11Bravo
05-13-2013, 08:46 PM
Based on your experience with the Keystone Jack, what design would you recommend I purchase? I see there are different ones in the way the wires are compressed into their individual places.


Another idea that might come in handy, especially with the Ren48LSD. I made short cat5 extensions that have an RJ45 plug on one end, and a RJ45 keystone jack on the other, and extend the Ren48 LSD jacks down below the foam rubber gasket in the bottom of the CG1500. This way, I don't have to keep pushing and pulling the plugs on the ends of my long cat5 runs through that gasket (which has a nasty habit of grabbing the locking tab on the plug since I don't use boots). I've actually done this on all of my boards that I have to attach cat5 to.

Jrd
05-13-2013, 09:47 PM
I wrap the back of the keystone Jack and two - three inches of cat5 with rubber splicing tape. Seals it up really good.

Hitting you up from somewhere in the ether

Rubber splicing tape? Is that different from electrical tape?

mikentn
05-13-2013, 09:54 PM
Unless you have a punch-down tool, you'll probably want the tooless keystone jacks.

mikentn
05-13-2013, 09:59 PM
Rubber splicing tape? Is that different from electrical tape? Yes, it is. It's a self-fusing rubber tape. Good stuff.

http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/mediawebserver?mwsId=SSSSSufSevTsZxtUNx_UnxMSevUqe vTSevTSevTSeSSSSSS--

11Bravo
05-13-2013, 10:05 PM
At the present I don't have any CAT5 cables, plugs, jacks or tools

budude
05-13-2013, 10:15 PM
Yes, it is. It's a self-fusing rubber tape. Good stuff.

http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/mediawebserver?mwsId=SSSSSufSevTsZxtUNx_UnxMSevUqe vTSevTSevTSeSSSSSS--

+1 on this stuff - You pull it tight and it stretches and sticks to itself for good. I've used it to join PVC pipes for floods (so I can take them apart if I want) and also used them on all my pixel string connections. Highly Recommended!

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=472069549482197&set=pb.398604780162008.-2207520000.1368497831.&type=3&theater

mikentn
05-13-2013, 10:39 PM
At the present I don't have any CAT5 cables, plugs, jacks or tools Then you'll probably want to look at the tool-less keystone jacks. www.monoprice.com has them listed for a little over $1 a piece. The reviews are mixed for the tool-less variety, but without a 110 punch down tool, you're pretty much limited to them.

Jrd
05-13-2013, 11:55 PM
Yes, it is. It's a self-fusing rubber tape. Good stuff.

http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/mediawebserver?mwsId=SSSSSufSevTsZxtUNx_UnxMSevUqe vTSevTSevTSeSSSSSS--

Looks very handy!

Is this it? Lowes (http://www.lowes.com/pd_158594-98-2242_0__?productId=3127861&PID=1869786&SID=-e2bf6c3-13ea11938bc--c8&cm_mmc=AFF_CJ-_-1869786-_-1687103-_-10926682) Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Scotch-Linerless-Electrical-75-Inch-15-Foot/dp/B00004WCCK/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1368502853&sr=8-2&keywords=rubber+splicing+tape)

Jrd
05-13-2013, 11:58 PM
Then you'll probably want to look at the tool-less keystone jacks. www.monoprice.com has them listed for a little over $1 a piece. The reviews are mixed for the tool-less variety, but without a 110 punch down tool, you're pretty much limited to them.

Home depot used to sell a small box of keystone jacks that came with a plastic punchdown tool. Not extremely comfortable but if you aren't doing many then it works fine.

11Bravo
05-22-2013, 12:15 PM
The punch down tool, is it spring loaded, and you release it to punch the wire into place. Or do you use physical force to seat the wire?

LabRat
05-22-2013, 12:22 PM
Typically the ones at Home Depot (around here anyway) that were bundled with the jacks, we simply "shaped plastic". They would simply direct the force from your hand, to the appropriate pressure points to punch the wire into the jack. Though, there was a more expensive tool on the peg board as well.

mikentn
05-22-2013, 12:50 PM
Looks very handy!

Is this it? Lowes (http://www.lowes.com/pd_158594-98-2242_0__?productId=3127861&PID=1869786&SID=-e2bf6c3-13ea11938bc--c8&cm_mmc=AFF_CJ-_-1869786-_-1687103-_-10926682) Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Scotch-Linerless-Electrical-75-Inch-15-Foot/dp/B00004WCCK/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1368502853&sr=8-2&keywords=rubber+splicing+tape)

Sorry, didn't see the links at the bottom. No, neither one is splicing tape, although Lowe's does carry it, I'm pretty sure.

Hitting you up from somewhere in the ether

mikentn
05-22-2013, 12:52 PM
The punch down tool, is it spring loaded, and you release it to punch the wire into place. Or do you use physical force to seat the wire?

The one I have is a spring-loaded impact type.

Hitting you up from somewhere in the ether

Jrd
05-22-2013, 12:53 PM
Physical, I am not aware of any designs with a spring. It is not hard to punch down.

Edit: Oh well I guess they do come spring loaded, but still it isn't extremely hard to do.

jpb
05-22-2013, 05:51 PM
The spring loading is more to ensure you don't apply too much pressure. You put the tool in place and push and once you get to the required pressure the tool clicks and you feel the pressure release.

As a side note I have a tool similar to the 110 style that has little scissors that cut the wire as it clicks home. My 110 just shears the wire as it clicks home and I generally need to tidy up with diags.

Jon

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