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DaveJZ
02-10-2011, 02:05 PM
I'm sure in this relm of things once I get this down it will work like cutting butter... It's just getting it down :D

I'm trying to etch some SSR's and I'm having issues. I etched a few using the iron method on photo paper I had here from who knows how long ago .. However I went through 4 other papers trying to find the same one that worked as good. It turns out I had the Kodak Glossy photo paper.

Anyway, I was using a copier but that got old because going through the paper I had to change (and waste) alot of time and money. Plus I didn't know it would work until I got home. I found a couple of Cannon personal copiers for $20 for both so I said what the heck.

I have Paper I know works and a copier at home. I printed a couple sheets off and transfered. The 2nd one worked out good.. and I etched the one that turned out good and finished it came out fine.

So whats the issue right? Toner and paper is good... Well.. Not a single one has been a good enough transfer to etch since that one. I've tried I think everything I possibly could. Changing papers, printing them on magazines. It seemed for a while that the one area was not transfering... but now it's turned into 85% is not. I've cleaned my copper, removed tarnish, I even broke the iron doing it... (thats what giving me the time to post this since the wife was in town and I'm waiting for the new iron) I've used dowel under the copper, and even a couple pencils. I'm on a plywood surface... and have even used our butcher block cutting board under. I've used the point of the iron and went over every trace and still had issues, even used the leading edge on the side. They've even soaked till the paper fell off on it's own... oh yeah with most of the toner :evil:

I just cannot come up with any good solutions... except the second one transfered.:confused:

Any suggestion would be great I really want to get this down!!! :grin:

kychristmas
02-10-2011, 02:26 PM
I'm sure in this relm of things once I get this down it will work like cutting butter... It's just getting it down :D


I'm afraid this is wrong. It will never be automatic, but you will learn how to deal with all the issues.

It sounds to me like something has changed on your copier or the paper. The toner is getting adhered to the paper (like it was supposed to) and simply staying there.

What kind of paper? Maybe you just got lucky the time it worked. I use Glossy Brochure paper, but I have heard that the Magazine pages (if your printer/copier can handle it) is stupid easy. I go through issues with my brochure paper depending on humidity and stuff like that. One thing that helps is to let the copier coold down and make the copy as soon as you can. That way the rollers and heating elements are a bit cooler and don't do as good of a job fusing the toner onto the paper.

tstraub
02-10-2011, 03:29 PM
Getting the toner to stick seems to be the hardest part. In my experience when it doesn't stick it comes down to one of two reasons. The first reason is type of paper used I use Staples brand presentation paper and it works well. The second reason is board preparation. I use a Scotch Brite pad to scuff the board then clean it with isopropyl alcohol and a paper towel. Clean the board at least twice. I clean it until I don't see any more black on the paper towel. After its clean handle the board only by the edges The natural oils on your fingers can prevent the toner from sticking.

I place the copper clad on a dish towel spread out on the kitchen table. Iron in both directions with firm pressure. Then I go back over it in circles making sure to get every trace covered at least a few times. Then I let the board cool while ironing the next board. Then i take the first board and put it in the water and start ironing the next. Once you get the hang of it you can keep moving. Always ironing one while another cools off so you can move it to the water pan. I always expect some failures so I start out with extras. Some days Thing go great some days they don't. Stick with it and you'll find something that works for you.

Tyler

ctmal
02-10-2011, 03:56 PM
I have heard that some brands of toner have issues as well. I know alot of websites say brother toner cartridges don't work well. That might be something to look into.
Tyler is right, the copper has to be roughed up pretty good to get the toner to stick. Also, how long are you heating it? I've found that by the time I'm done heating everything I can pretty much see through the paper.
Also, if you want to rule out whether it's you or your hardware let me know and I'll send you a printout on staples photo paper.

dirknerkle
02-10-2011, 04:37 PM
I can't add much to what's already been suggested except to say...

... the thicker the paper is, the harder it is to get the toner to stick because thick paper is a heat insulator. Thin is good, thick is bad.
... a paper that's designed for ink jet printing is a dog that won't hunt. It can't handle the temperature and toner "melts" into it.
... if there's a setting to increase the amount of toner per print that can help. Sometimes this is a manual setting/lever inside the printer itself.
... it may help to heat the board first -- use something like baking/parchment or other thin paper and heat it up with the iron. Then put your image on it.

DaveJZ
02-10-2011, 07:09 PM
well... I saw my wife had a finger hut catalog by the couch so I figured what better thing to try then that.... I did manage to get the sheets through the copier... Sometimes I had to tape the edges to a piece of regular paper.. This seemed to work really well, however you can't rub the paper with the iron because it is so thin and any movment is shown on the clad. Only pressure would work.. and even then some areas would be wrong. My biggest issue was the fact that the toner would spread out and my pads would run together. I got 2 others done using the mag paper.

With the kodak paper it is fairly thin, with the iron on high, and I could see the toner through the paper. I've kept it long enough to turn the paper brown. It would still leave toner on the paper..

Going to try to master...lol the magazine paper..

tstraub
02-10-2011, 07:53 PM
i don't know how close your failed boards are but just so you know. You can fix broken traces with a Sharpe marker before you put it in the acid. I will usually fix one trace and/or pad if needed. Two or more and I clean it off and start over. The marker doesn't resist as well as toner so its not wise to use this on high current traces.

Tyler

ctmal
02-10-2011, 07:58 PM
well... I saw my wife had a finger hut catalog by the couch so I figured what better thing to try then that.... I did manage to get the sheets through the copier... Sometimes I had to tape the edges to a piece of regular paper.. This seemed to work really well, however you can't rub the paper with the iron because it is so thin and any movment is shown on the clad. Only pressure would work.. and even then some areas would be wrong. My biggest issue was the fact that the toner would spread out and my pads would run together. I got 2 others done using the mag paper.

With the kodak paper it is fairly thin, with the iron on high, and I could see the toner through the paper. I've kept it long enough to turn the paper brown. It would still leave toner on the paper..

Going to try to master...lol the magazine paper..

You could try what I do(I do it to save photo paper). Print the circuit on a regular piece of paper then tape a piece of your magazine paper to cover just the circuit(plus a little extra). Reprint it onto your moded paper. If you don't separate it after you print it the 2nd time it might give you enough thickness to iron it.

DaveJZ
02-10-2011, 10:25 PM
Where the pads have ran together I took a small screwdriver and scraped the toner out from those areas... Errors In Larger traces I borrowed my daughters finger nail polish and a sharpie for the smaller... The cost of Magazines are well... I'll just tell my wife to order more catalogs to look at :D

It's the no rubbing.... pressure thing I'm having issues with... I may cusion the board with a washcloth next go around.. we'll see I still have quite a few to make

DaveJZ
02-10-2011, 11:08 PM
Apparently.. The moon was perfectly aligned with the north star which was aligned with the clouds in the sky which was aligned to the exact position that my three children were in. I transfered 2 boards tonight. These were printed on Magazine paper that was taped to a regular sheet of paper. I cut out my design and placed both the plain paper and the magazine paper on the board which was scotch brite"d" and cleaned with alcohol. This was placed on a towel. I ironed on high. I could only use minimal pressure with the edge of the iron... and the rest was direct pressure.

Of course they both turned out perfect with no issues at all... now of Course I have to get up at 4am for work so these two were the only two I could do and I couldn't etch either.

What are the chances of this happening again? Prolly none..

Thanks for the help!!

tstraub
02-10-2011, 11:40 PM
Good to hear. Now next time try patting you head, rubbing your tummy and hopping on one foot. You find a way to get consistent results. Some days everything works and some days nothing works its just the nature of the beast.

Tyler

Matt_Edwards
02-11-2011, 12:18 AM
I would also contribute:
Make sure there are no burrs on edge of the PCB - I found out the hard way.
PCB cleanliness was the most important issue. a single thumb print is enough to stuff a board

rkhanso
02-12-2011, 01:39 AM
I will also give a thumbs up for printing the image on a piece of paper, then cutting a sheet of your glossy paper (I've used press-n-peel in the past, expensive but it works great) oversized and tape it over the image and run it through the laser printer again.

And like Matt said, your board has to be perfectly flat and clean. If you get a high spot on it, the iron can't make the toner adhere to the board evenly.

Lastly, practice makes perfect (well, useable anyway)

griffixdc
02-16-2011, 03:03 AM
Yay my dad is getting rid of his laser jet printer so now i don't have to do the ink jet transfers. i have no idea why he is getting rid of it but i am not complaining lol it prints 35 pages per minute and has a duty rating of 50,000 pages per day a lot better than the ones i was looking at :) now for the etching process i will get to you on that :)

dirknerkle
02-16-2011, 12:25 PM
...it prints 35 pages per minute and has a duty rating of 50,000 pages per day...

GOOD DEAL! You'll be able to make ALL the boards for everybody! When do you start? What's the pricing? How fast will you be able to make a custom order? Will they have a solder mask? How about silk screening on the top for parts placement? Huh? When can I get some?

:lol:

griffixdc
02-16-2011, 12:33 PM
GOOD DEAL! You'll be able to make ALL the boards for everybody! When do you start? What's the pricing? How fast will you be able to make a custom order? Will they have a solder mask? How about silk screening on the top for parts placement? Huh? When can I get some?

:lol:
lmao :) dang forgot about the silk screening lol well another process and another dollar....Dirk your a kick i dont think i will ever be as good as you at this etching stuff :)

IdunBenhad
02-16-2011, 12:35 PM
Hi:
For some of you experimenters out there, I am trying a little different way to transfer the toner. I am waiting for my PC board material to arrive, so haven't had much of a chance to try it, but preliminary results look good.

I am trying a glossy photo paper from RoyalBrites. This paper is a little old and the print side is not a bright, shiny glossy coating. It's closer to "glossy matte", if that makes sense, but it does have a coating on it.

I transferred the pattern to the paper and then put the pattern on a Radio Shack perf board that has the copper holes in it for soldering. Of course, this left a rough surface, but it was just for experimental purposes only.

I put the pattern/board onto the flat surface of a waffle iron. The grilles in the iron can be either waffle or flat. They are easily reversible. I tried to keep the heat at about 285 F. As the iron and board heated up, I used a wooden roller that is about 1.5->2 inches wide and rolled the pattern back and forth and every other direction, applying as much pressure to the roller as I could. The roller is used in crafts for sticking letters, etc. to different materials.

I did this for about five minutes. Then I put the board/pattern in water and about 5 minutes later, the paper just floated off, leaving the pattern and no paper residue. The pattern appears to be adhering to the board very good. Because the copper on the board is nothing more than round circles, it didn't stick to some places and I didn't clean the board all that good.

I got the waffle iron at a garage sale for $4.00. It has a temperature control on it. The temp. control is not the best in the world, but it works.

The next thing I'm going to try is to get two 1/8" thick aluminum plates to fit in the grills, put the board/pattern between them and heat it up. By holding pressure on the lid, it might be enough to successfully transfer the toner. Maybe I'll get a big weight and put on it.

If anyone else tries this or has done it before, let me know how it came out.

Mactayl
02-16-2011, 12:37 PM
GOOD DEAL! You'll be able to make ALL the boards for everybody! When do you start? What's the pricing? How fast will you be able to make a custom order? Will they have a solder mask? How about silk screening on the top for parts placement? Huh? When can I get some?

:lol:

ROTFLMAO......:lol::lol:

griffixdc
02-16-2011, 12:38 PM
Hi:
For some of you experimenters out there, I am trying a little different way to transfer the toner. I am waiting for my PC board material to arrive, so haven't had much of a chance to try it, but preliminary results look good.

I am trying a glossy photo paper from RoyalBrites. This paper is a little old and the print side is not a bright, shiny glossy coating. It's closer to "glossy matte", if that makes sense, but it does have a coating on it.

I transferred the pattern to the paper and then put the pattern on a Radio Shack perf board that has the copper holes in it for soldering. Of course, this left a rough surface, but it was just for experimental purposes only.

I put the pattern/board onto the flat surface of a waffle iron. The grilles in the iron can be either waffle or flat. They are easily reversible. I tried to keep the heat at about 285 F. As the iron and board heated up, I used a wooden roller that is about 1.5->2 inches wide and rolled the pattern back and forth and every other direction, applying as much pressure to the roller as I could. The roller is used in crafts for sticking letters, etc. to different materials.

I did this for about five minutes. Then I put the board/pattern in water and about 5 minutes later, the paper just floated off, leaving the pattern and no paper residue. The pattern appears to be adhering to the board very good. Because the copper on the board is nothing more than round circles, it didn't stick to some places and I didn't clean the board all that good.

I got the waffle iron at a garage sale for $4.00. It has a temperature control on it. The temp. control is not the best in the world, but it works.

The next thing I'm going to try is to get two 1/8" thick aluminum plates to fit in the grills, put the board/pattern between them and heat it up. By holding pressure on the lid, it might be enough to successfully transfer the toner. Maybe I'll get a big weight and put on it.

If anyone else tries this or has done it before, let me know how it came out.

will a Panini Grill work :)...let me know your results is it cheaper to do it this way(maybe you mentioned it i might have missed it)

IdunBenhad
02-16-2011, 12:54 PM
Hi:
I don't know if its cheaper or not, but I'm just trying to find a way to easily and successfully transfer the toner to the copper. Besides, Grumpy kinda' turns her nose up at me using her iron for transfers. Maybe I should have bought one at the garage sale.

I am not familiar with a Panini Grill, so can't help you there.

kychristmas
02-16-2011, 01:20 PM
Hi:
I don't know if its cheaper or not, but I'm just trying to find a way to easily and successfully transfer the toner to the copper. Besides, Grumpy kinda' turns her nose up at me using her iron for transfers. Maybe I should have bought one at the garage sale.

I am not familiar with a Panini Grill, so can't help you there.

I haven't seen a Panini grill that could press like thin and most have Ridges on them and are not flat plates. I t-shirt transfer press would be similar and probably work great, but they are expensive.

The best is a Card Laminator. I had access to one at one my clients, but have been back to using Iron. I've been looking for them on Craigslist and eBay. The good kind that can be adjusted to the thickness of a PCB are more expensive.

I see Irons on Freecycle and at Goodwill all of the time. They are usuall old and heavy duty which is better for this.

griffixdc
02-16-2011, 04:23 PM
I haven't seen a Panini grill that could press like thin and most have Ridges on them and are not flat plates. I t-shirt transfer press would be similar and probably work great, but they are expensive.

The best is a Card Laminator. I had access to one at one my clients, but have been back to using Iron. I've been looking for them on Craigslist and eBay. The good kind that can be adjusted to the thickness of a PCB are more expensive.

I see Irons on Freecycle and at Goodwill all of the time. The are usuall old and heavy duty which is better for this.

I was kidding about the panini grill but I do have a laminator that can laminate things 6 inches wide

IdunBenhad
02-25-2011, 10:14 AM
Hi:
So far, the waffle-iron grill method isn't working so good. I tried a couple of boards and the transfer was spotty. However, after using Grumpys iron (she was gone somewhere), the Royal Brites paper I used (mentioned earlier) really worked. I have two boards ready for etching. The iron gets really hot and may have been too hot, as there were a few blurred traces, but the board is acceptable after a little "repair" with a Sharpie pen.

I think I didn't get the waffle-iron hot enough. It is capable of high heat, I just have to find the right temperature. Also, using a roller and trying to get enough pressure on a hot board is not the most fun thing to do. I am trying to come up with a method to apply the pressure and heat at the same time. I want to try aluminum plates, but haven't got them yet.

For your information, the Royal Brites paper number is 28975. I am checking now with the company to see if it's still made.

More later.

tstraub
02-25-2011, 10:39 AM
Thanks for the update Idun. I almost tried the waffle iron method the other day. But, I couldn't find the waffle iron. I think its in the motor-home and its covered with a tarp for winter storage. It seemed like to much work to go retrieve it so I stuck with the tried and true clothes iron.

Tyler

griffixdc
02-25-2011, 02:30 PM
i think an Iron is the best cheap way you can regulate temperature and apply good pressure. it may take awhile but it should be good.

dirknerkle
02-25-2011, 03:13 PM
I think I didn't get the waffle-iron hot enough. It is capable of high heat, I just have to find the right temperature. Also, using a roller and trying to get enough pressure on a hot board is not the most fun thing to do. I am trying to come up with a method to apply the pressure and heat at the same time. I want to try aluminum plates, but haven't got them yet.


You might pick up (or borrow) a non-contact thermometer to see how uniform the temperature is across the waffle iron's surface, and also to find out how to set the temperature dial on it. I think our buddies at Harbor Freight have something for around $30 -- and I vaguely recall Budude picked up an inexpensive one last year when he was making his reflow oven, maybe he'll chime in with his source...

budude
02-25-2011, 03:54 PM
You might pick up (or borrow) a non-contact thermometer to see how uniform the temperature is across the waffle iron's surface, and also to find out how to set the temperature dial on it. I think our buddies at Harbor Freight have something for around $30 -- and I vaguely recall Budude picked up an inexpensive one last year when he was making his reflow oven, maybe he'll chime in with his source...

Well - wasn't so inexpensive but it works good. It's same unit as a much more expensive Fluke unit - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000O80B5M?ie=UTF8&redirect=true. I've used this quite a bit - very happy with it...

griffixdc
02-25-2011, 05:14 PM
Well - wasn't so inexpensive but it works good. It's same unit as a much more expensive Fluke unit - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000O80B5M?ie=UTF8&redirect=true. I've used this quite a bit - very happy with it...

i do admit Flukes are on of the best consumer grade electronic testers but are very pricey, but they come with pretty much life time warranty and free calibrations. but if that is not needed then the other testers are almost the same and without everyday use, you will not notice a difference. :) good find!!! i wonder if a BBQ temp sensor would be efficient enough for this application because they are cheaper.

dirknerkle
02-25-2011, 05:31 PM
i wonder if a BBQ temp sensor would be efficient enough for this application because they are cheaper.

Only if you're going to whip up some burgers on some overheated triacs! :lol: :lol:

Thanks for the source info, Brian -- I just ordered one of them. Now I've got to start looking for something on my stuff that gets hot!

griffixdc
02-25-2011, 05:41 PM
Only if you're going to whip up some burgers on some overheated triacs! :lol: :lol:

Thanks for the source info, Brian -- I just ordered one of them. Now I've got to start looking for something on my stuff that gets hot!

COMMMON i was being scurious lmao :) :)

ctmal
02-25-2011, 05:58 PM
You can pick one up at Home depot (http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100674438/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053).

tstraub
02-25-2011, 06:10 PM
Just to add a little info on how these non-contact thermometers work. The laser has nothing to do with the temp. sensing it only aids in aiming. The sampling area is cone shaped. If you hold the unit close you get an accurate reading of a small area. As you back away you get an average temp. reading of a much larger area. The important thing to remember is that just because you can put the red dot on a triac from across the room doesn't mean that you are taking an accurate temp. reading.

Tyler

IdunBenhad
02-25-2011, 08:15 PM
Hi:
I tried some more boards on the waffle iron griddle, flat plate side. It got real hot and I can measure the temperature with a probe on my fancy, whoop-de-doo Harbor Freight multimeter. I got the temperature well above 300 degrees, but I can't get a good transfer of the toner. I think my method of applying pressure, which is with a wooden roller used in crafts, is not enough.

I did the iron method, (Grumpy was inside and didn't know what was going on--I wonder if I could trade my waffle iron for her iron?) and got three good transfers and etched three different boards today.

I had also reported that the paper I was using just floated off when put in water. Well, if the griddle method is used and not enough pressure is applied, it does. When using the iron method, the paper tends to stick, but will come off with a little effort. So, it does work.

I have the boards etched and drilled and I'm happy with me! I did a good job for the first time.

Etchant was hydrogen peroxide and muriatic acid. 1 cup of Hydrogen peroxide to 1/2 cup acid. I put the mixture (acid poured into the peroxide) in a plastic container. I put a small table lamp with a halogen bulb over the board in the acid and using a small sponge, I periodically wiped the board. Etching took about 5-6 minutes each. I think the lamp was warming the board, even though it really didn't warm the acid directly. I could see the copper disappearing very rapidly.

Funsies.

ctmal
02-25-2011, 08:31 PM
This (http://www.hobby-lobby.com/450_degree_sealing_iron_232337_prd1.htm?pSearchQue ryId=1200330) is what I use instead of a regular home iron. I've had better luck with that than I ever had with a regular clothes iron and it's easier to work with.

dirknerkle
02-25-2011, 10:50 PM
I did the iron method, (Grumpy was inside and didn't know what was going on--I wonder if I could trade my waffle iron for her iron?) and got ...

Now you can have that "waffle weave" shirt that you've always wanted!



I have the boards etched and drilled and I'm happy with me! I did a good job for the first time.


Good for you, Idun! Way to go!



Etchant was hydrogen peroxide and muriatic acid. 1 cup of Hydrogen peroxide to 1/2 cup acid. I put the mixture (acid poured into the peroxide) in a plastic container. I put a small table lamp with a halogen bulb over the board in the acid and using a small sponge, I periodically wiped the board. Etching took about 5-6 minutes each. I think the lamp was warming the board, even though it really didn't warm the acid directly. I could see the copper disappearing very rapidly.

Funsies.

Yes, Funsies indeed!!!

DaveJZ
02-25-2011, 11:51 PM
So I found that taping a piece of magazine paper to regular paper and copying my transfer onto the magazine paper works great. i've had little error in doing these now that I place a towel under the PCB and use a piece of paper over the magazine so I can move the iron... It's been working great so far!!!

Might have been the new iron lol

IdunBenhad
02-26-2011, 12:55 AM
Hi:
DaveJZ: I tried a glossy advertisement, but it didn't work too good. I think I should have used a magazine page, like you did. I also used the "roller" method when ironing the board. A wooden dowel was under the board and the iron on top. Rolled the board back and forth on the dowel, which helped apply more pressure. I am having a little trouble with the edges, but I think that is just not putting enough pressure on it.

I will try the magazine page next. The paper I'm using is limited in supply. I can't find it anymore, and so far haven't received a reply from Royal Brites. Besides, the magazine page is cheaper!! (I'm El Cheapo Numero Uno)

DaveJZ
02-26-2011, 01:15 AM
The trick is to get your wife to put in for them free mail order catalogs.... But make sure she knows not to order anything from them..

Just think of how good that sounds to the pocket book.. even delivered to your door

griffixdc
02-26-2011, 04:01 AM
Ok just got done testing my method of madness and worked great haven't etched it yet just transferred some test images.....i heated the PCB to 275 degrees. While sitting on a cooking stone that it was heated on i then used a clothes iron at setting "linen" applied great amount of pressure mostly using the side of the iron not the complete flat side so it wasn't a direct heat ..after about 3 min i soaked in water and was amazed it stuck almost perfectly no mistakes at least so far i am on my 3rd one :)

IdunBenhad
02-26-2011, 02:30 PM
Hi:
Subtitle: HOW TO WARM YOUR ACID WITHOUT REALLY TRYING

I've been at it again. Been doing some etching and this morning everything was cold out in Control Central.

I have a Tupperware container I bought at a garage sale and it has a 1.5" deep lid. I turn the lid upside down in the container and do my etching in that, as it works out to be a nice size for the boards I've been doing. As I said, everything was cold this morning and the etching was taking forever, so I filled the container with hot water, put the lid back down in it, the acid warmed up and etching progressed very nicely. I don't have a fish tank heater, so this is about as cheap it gets. Excuse me: low cost.

EL CHEAPO NUMERO UNO signing off

tstraub
02-26-2011, 07:55 PM
Idun,
I have also used the warm water bath method for warming acid. Its alway worked great for me and you get the added bonus of having extra water close if you need to quickly clean up some accidental drips. If you don't mind me asking what are you working so hard on? Is it something from here or something new to dazzle us all?
Tyler

IdunBenhad
02-26-2011, 09:04 PM
Hi:
tstraub: I'm working on the W3 and VC power supplies I wrote about earlier. I think they are under "Radio Waves". I made some changes in the PC boards and this is my first trip into etching, etc. dirknerkle had been helping me out on the PC boards, but I don't like imposing on people, so I started doing my own. So far, I've had fairly good luck, at least for the first time doing it.

I had also layed out two other boards that mount the transformers for the W3 regulator. The transformers substitute for the wall warts that the W3 was designed for.

DaveJZ
02-26-2011, 11:59 PM
I have borrowed the wifes heating pad out from behind her and used it to wrap my "cereal" container my acid is in. Works pretty good

IdunBenhad
02-28-2011, 03:40 PM
Hi:
I've been out in Control Central doing some playing around (what else?).

Attached is a picture of the top side of a W3 board. The registration is a little off, but that is my fault for not paying attention.

I did it the same way I did the etched side and using the same paper. It was cleaned first with steel wool and then cleaned with carburetor cleaner. (It's cheap at Walmart and does an excellent job.)

Etch the board and drill it. Mirror the silkscreen image and print it, then apply the same as doing the etched side. I went outside in the sun and aligned the holes, but let it slip on the way back to the iron.

Worked for me. I'll be more careful next time.

tstraub
02-28-2011, 03:53 PM
Looks great!! I can never get the silkscreen to look that good on my boards. I have went to simply printing the silk on regular paper then just using it as reference while building boards.

Tyler

dirknerkle
02-28-2011, 04:45 PM
Looks terrific, Idun!

I don't bother with a silkscreen at all for my own boards. Instead, I take the lazy approach and print out the "top only" on paper, using it as a reference while I assemble/solder it. If I'm feeling particularly creative, I'll print both sides out in color for the psychedelic version of the lazy approach...

DaveJZ
02-28-2011, 06:43 PM
If I'm feeling particularly creative, I'll print both sides out in color for the psychedelic version of the lazy approach...

I printed a silkscreen for the simple 16 and it helped out alot. The issue I have is with Express I cannot mirror the picture when printing... Or at least I haven't found it yet

tstraub
02-28-2011, 07:00 PM
I printed a silkscreen for the simple 16 and it helped out alot. The issue I have is with Express I cannot mirror the picture when printing... Or at least I haven't found it yet

I have a Brother printer and it has a mirror function built into the printer driver software under advanced settings. Check your printer driver for a similar setting.
Tyler

IdunBenhad
02-28-2011, 07:53 PM
Hi:
I never thought about checking the printer driver. Mine probably does to.

I went about the long way. I exported the image as a mechanical drawing. It came out as a BMP. I then loaded that into Paint Shop Pro X2, mirrored it, printed it as a PDF and there you are.

A lot of steps when the mirror function was already in the printer driver. Oh well, keeps me occupied and out of the bars.

Wombat
02-28-2011, 10:09 PM
I found a site here which has instructions for doing a cheap prototype boards using a laser printer.

http://www.riccibitti.com/pcb/pcb.htm

Wombat