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View Full Version : How do you keep your blowmolds standing up?



Jrd
01-12-2011, 01:06 AM
Well just as the title says, When your blowmolds aren't encased in ice, or if they never get encased in ice, how do you keep them standing up when the wind wants to blow them over?

rdartist
01-12-2011, 01:45 AM
20lb bag of ball bearings from your brother in law...If you don't have a brother in law, try pea gravel.

Ronp
01-12-2011, 03:49 PM
I used 4 ft 3/4 inch dowels drive them in then put the blowmold over it .
some use the green metal garden stake .Most of my blowmolds have a hole on the bottom.

kychristmas
01-12-2011, 04:01 PM
Scraps of PVC conduit hammered into the ground. Cut a bit of an angle on the end to make a point and hammer into the ground. Place the blowmold over the conduit through the hole in the bottom. I put two blowmolds back in my yard this season (kids demanded) and this is what I did.

Jrd
01-12-2011, 08:29 PM
20lb bag of ball bearings from your brother in law...If you don't have a brother in law, try pea gravel.

Hmm, that's a good method, no brother in-law yet though. One year I used chunks of sandstone but it took a good number of them to keep the blowmolds standing up.


I used 4 ft 3/4 inch dowels drive them in then put the blowmold over it .
some use the green metal garden stake .Most of my blowmolds have a hole on the bottom.

Scraps of PVC conduit hammered into the ground. Cut a bit of an angle on the end to make a point and hammer into the ground. Place the blowmold over the conduit through the hole in the bottom. I put two blowmolds back in my yard this season (kids demanded) and this is what I did.

Those are good methods, my ground is too hard to take wood or PVC though so I would have to use rebar.
Do you guys worry at all about the lightbulb hitting the support when the blowmold moves?

DennyMo
01-13-2011, 01:36 PM
This has worked for me with my penguins, depending on what the base of your blowmolds look like, YMMV: drive a tent stake into the ground on either side and hook a bunjee cord from one stake, around the base, and hook it back to the same stake. Repeat for the other side. Bunjees come in so many colors, you should be able to find one that isn't too glaringly obvious.

kychristmas
01-13-2011, 02:39 PM
Hmm, that's a good method, no brother in-law yet though. One year I used chunks of sandstone but it took a good number of them to keep the blowmolds standing up.

Those are good methods, my ground is too hard to take wood or PVC though so I would have to use rebar.
Do you guys worry at all about the lightbulb hitting the support when the blowmold moves?

First, if I was setting up my display and it was that cold, I wouldn't have a display. Under normal Circumstances, you don't ever have frozen ground in your area, do you? Even if you do, it certainly woudln't happen in November or Early December when were typically setting up.

I don't worry about the post hitting the bulb. Doesn't seem to do anything. Mine were blowing around on the pole for a month and on my last night, they were still lighting up. And I have a large supply of Dollar Tree crappy 40W bulbs if it does.

Jrd
01-13-2011, 07:35 PM
This has worked for me with my penguins, depending on what the base of your blowmolds look like, YMMV: drive a tent stake into the ground on either side and hook a bunjee cord from one stake, around the base, and hook it back to the same stake. Repeat for the other side. Bunjees come in so many colors, you should be able to find one that isn't too glaringly obvious.

Hmm, that's an interesting idea although I don't think it would work for me unless I reversed the bungee cords by having them hook to the hole in the bottom and wrap around the stake. I have a 3-4' tall snowman that falls over when we get a good wind, I also have a few wise men that like to fall over and none of them have bases like a candle.


First, if I was setting up my display and it was that cold, I wouldn't have a display. Under normal Circumstances, you don't ever have frozen ground in your area, do you? Even if you do, it certainly woudln't happen in November or Early December when were typically setting up.

Sorry I should have stated why I can't use PVC and wood. My ground is mostly sandstone with alot of quartz so wooden stakes break pretty easily, I doubt PVC stakes would do much better.

Some of the ground is probably frozen now but it is not frozen often.

RRohn
04-15-2011, 05:02 PM
Some blowmolds have holes in the bottom. (maybe make a hole in the bottom) Try bricks or chunks of metal for weights. If space inside is uneven try a ziplock filled with fresh concrete. it will settle in the uneven spaces and harden. Another is to screw a base of some sort onto it and weight the base down.

Andy.wpg
04-15-2011, 06:10 PM
Well just as the title says, When your blowmolds aren't encased in ice, or if they never get encased in ice, how do you keep them standing up when the wind wants to blow them over?

For once, 6 months of winter is an advantage! Like you suggested, we just pile snow on the bases, it turns to ice, and voila!

michaelc
04-15-2011, 06:41 PM
I use 2' lengths of Rebar driven into the ground. Then I just put the molds over them through the hole in the bottom. On some of my blowmolds there wasn't a hole so I just drilled one. To stop them from spinning around, i keep the power cords running to the back all ganged together on an extension cord so they really can't go anywhere.

I find working with the rebar is the strongest and easiest to get out in January. PVC can crack, Wood breaks and I hate the orange fiberglass driveway markers because the fiberglass gets all over.

Jrd
04-17-2011, 07:44 PM
Sounds like rebar for them to sit on is the most common choice.

Matt_Edwards
04-17-2011, 08:51 PM
How big is the hole?
How about making some sealed hessian bags filled with gravel or sand. The bag will fill the base of the blow mold and should give even weight distribution.

ErnieHorning
04-17-2011, 11:12 PM
This simple way to add weight is to place play sand in Ziplok baggies. Place as many bags as you need without blocking the light, evenly around the inside of the base. The bags will keep the moisture out.

It doesn't require very large re-bar but long enough in case the mold lifts up a bit from wind, though the sand bags should keep it down.. To remove re-bar from ice, just tap it into the ground a bit, grab with a vise-grip, twist and pull.

Gebbinn
04-19-2011, 10:47 AM
I cut another hole in the back of my snowman, so I could access it. The only hole it had was in the bottom. Then I screwed it to a 2X2 base, formed into an X. Then you can weight the ends of the 2X2 if the base alone is not enough. had 60mph winds this last season, and my blowmolds did not even move, though a couple of my inflatables were found about a 1/4 mile away.

Jrd
04-20-2011, 08:57 PM
How big is the hole?
How about making some sealed hessian bags filled with gravel or sand. The bag will fill the base of the blow mold and should give even weight distribution.

Probably about 6-8 inches haven't measured though.

smartalec
04-20-2011, 09:41 PM
i put one of them eyebolts near the botton, then secured it in place by pouring cement inside it, the cement make's it stay standing, an i run a chain through the eyebolt to stop it from walking off.
an in real strong wind area's use a cable tie from the eyebolt to the chain, so it cant roll too far.
just makes them a little heavy to store.
but i have had a problem lately after 6yrs the cement want to crack up a little bit inside

Jrd
04-21-2011, 12:20 AM
i put one of them eyebolts near the botton, then secured it in place by pouring cement inside it, the cement make's it stay standing, an i run a chain through the eyebolt to stop it from walking off.
an in real strong wind area's use a cable tie from the eyebolt to the chain, so it cant roll too far.
just makes them a little heavy to store.
but i have had a problem lately after 6yrs the cement want to crack up a little bit inside

Six years sounds pretty good, but I wonder if the extra weight when moving and storing is worth it with the other methods.

Matt_Edwards
04-21-2011, 02:16 AM
Probably about 6-8 inches haven't measured though.

so with say 10inch bags ( zip locks sound good) you can fit a number in the whole and they won't fall out.

RobDude30
04-25-2011, 09:48 PM
I put a small piece of plywood inside the hole in the bottom and then attach a larger plywood base through the bottom with screws. Think sandwich the bottom of the blowmold in between 2 pieces of plywood. I then use metal stakes driven through the plywood base to hold them down. Nothing short of a tornado will move them.1020410205

Jrd
04-25-2011, 10:33 PM
so with say 10inch bags ( zip locks sound good) you can fit a number in the whole and they won't fall out.

That's a good idea!

A Marchini
05-31-2011, 10:10 PM
This simple way to add weight is to place play sand in Ziplok baggies. Place as many bags as you need without blocking the light, evenly around the inside of the base. The bags will keep the moisture out.

It doesn't require very large re-bar but long enough in case the mold lifts up a bit from wind, though the sand bags should keep it down.. To remove re-bar from ice, just tap it into the ground a bit, grab with a vise-grip, twist and pull.

The sand trick has worked for me for years. I will say to invest in the FREEZER BAG Ziploks, since anything too thin and you will tear the bag easily. I use quart side and throw them all around. My blow molds are not very high, tallest would be 3 feet and they don't seem to grab the wind much.

Tony M.

MANOWAR
06-01-2011, 08:56 AM
I bought some of those green garden stakes that look like "fake" rebar. It was a decision based on cost. I am going to see how it works this year.

Dink1120
02-04-2012, 01:49 AM
home depot sells green garden stakes, lighter grade than what holds the street signs up in a few heights. I use 14 gauge galvanized wire wrapped around each shape in two places, twist the wire tight around the shape give it a few spins so it stays on for storage then run one through the hold in the rod as you twist the two together behind the rod. Helps for security too if your ground freezes.

JasonPortwood
02-04-2012, 10:07 AM
I just drill two holes about 2 inches apart near the front and back of the blow mold right on the bottom edge. Then take a couple of tie wraps and make a loop on each side. Then a tent stake angled. The only time I've had a problem with that was soft ground and not realizing the large Santa needed three of those (because of the ground). Otherwise they were solid. I used coat hangers instead of the tie wraps before but the rust and storage issues (they can be sharp when cut) had me switch to tie wraps.

Cheapest tent stakes I found were the home depot ones which they sell at Christmas time.

-
Jason

Jrd
02-07-2012, 02:27 AM
I decided to use rebar to keep them up, I was surprised at how well it worked and that it did not damage then, we got gusts around 25-30 mph and they stayed put! Here's how I did it:
First I selected pieces of rebar(I was able to pick them up from a local job site dumpster but if you have to buy them then cut them down.) roughly 6-12" longer than my blowmolds are tall then I positioned my blowmolds where I wanted them. Once I knew where I wanted them I would tip them on their side placing the end of the piece of rebar in the center of where the blowmold was sitting then I used a post pounder (you could use a hammer, sledge, or rock but the post pounder makes it soo much easier) to drive it into the ground till it is about the same height as the blowmold, at this point you want to put your blowmold over it to see if it is too high or not, if the blowmold isn't touching the ground take it off and give the rebar another whack or two and try again, if you get it right on then the rebar should be right up in the top of the blowmold's hat or whatever it has up there, if it's not touching the top that's ok too.

This method even works for small blowmolds, just use a smaller piece of rebar, may need to use a different driver if your blowmold is only 1ft or so tall like my small santa.

If you are concerned about breaking the bulb or damaging the blowmold you can put a piece of PVC pipe over the rebar once you have driven it in at the very least this can prevent a broken bulb from grounding out.

If you are unfamiliar with a post pounder here is a picture:
13173
Basically it's a tube with a weight on one end and handles along the sides. You can get standard ones like this from most tool stores.

Leglamp
06-21-2012, 02:42 PM
I found using 3/4 wooden dowel rods or 1" pvc pipes cut to 4 foot long worked best for blow molds. PVC is much cheaper than rebar and easier to cut too! Hammer the rods or pipes at least a foot into the ground and then slide the blow mold over the pipe. Yes some will turn on you if it's really windy, but they won't blow away. My kids loved going out after the weather cleared and turning them back around. NOTE: When you pull the pipes or rods out in January (or February) twist them out carefully so they don't snap in half. It can be very darn cold in January where I live and I've had a few that snapped on me cause I didn't twist them out. Rebar rusts and is a pain to pull out when the ground is frozen solid.

For wire framed displays I found using regular tent stakes from Wal Mart or Target stay put the best. Use the ones that have a hook at the top where you hammer into the ground. I bought a pack of 6 for $2.88 at Wal Mart. That's less than .50 per stake. The stakes with the green tops are longer but they don't grip the earth very good. When it rains and the wind blows, they come out everytime.

Don't put bricks, rocks or bags of sand in you blow molds! When exposed to the elements, the plastic gets hard and brittle. They will break at the bottom if the wind pushes too hard against them. I've had a few break already and had to repair them. You can't beat mother nature, but if you try to work with her you'll keep your blow molds longer. For nativity animals, I used black polyester string and 12" landscaping nails. Tie each end of the string to a nail and drive one nail all the way into the ground. Route the other end of the string over the animal and drive that nail into the ground. Make sure the string is so tight that you can pluck it like a guitar string. My animals required 2 to 3 strings each.

Also make sure you tape all your connections with black electrical tape. Then tie multiple cords together with cable ties. This also helps prevent vandalism. If everything is taped together real good, no one can walk up and take them. Also keeps water out of the plugs and prevents shorting out your breaker panel. Always think safety when working around electricity. The last thing you want is someone walking onto your wet property during a rainstorm and getting electrocuted and then suing your butt off.

Well that's my two cents worth. Hope it helps!

bigwolfe07
09-07-2012, 02:45 PM
i use bricks in most of mine had to put 2 bricks in the tall ones but they stay standing in just about any kind of wind that Florida can throw at them

fireman5214
09-16-2012, 12:50 PM
I use old aluminum stakes that my grandparents used to put out their blowmolds, soft fall ground, mini slegehammer and pop them over and trust me we get ALOT of wind where I am. After season or to change a burned out lightbulb, just pull them up off and there you go. Also if its frozen ground the stake stays there until it thaws

Daryl
02-02-2013, 11:50 AM
we have used rebar for the last 15 years or so,it seems to be the easiest,we tried the sand in baggies but the weight for storage was a pain.I build a bin out of scrap plywood and 2x4 to store the rebar in,it has casters on the bottom to make it easy to roll out of the garage,we divided the bin into 3 sections the first section is for rebar 18" and under second is for rebar 2' to 3' 6" and the third is for the really tall stuff 4' and over.this make storage quick and easy.If you make a bin spend the extra on casters, a couple hundred pcs. of rebar will get pretty heavy.

timpwk
02-02-2013, 08:25 PM
With some blow molds you get (especially when buying thru estates and ebay) there are large holes in the bottom. What I have learned to do is to make bottom "plates" out of old plastic storage containers. I cut the plates using tin shears. I then screw them to the bottom of the blow mold and drill a 1/2 inch hole in the plate and then put 1/2 inch dowels though them for staking. Depending on the size of the blow mold I use either one or two holes. That way if the bottom plate ever cracks or wears out I just replace it with another. I have shied away from rebar and sand bags due to the weight. I have also learned to buy the hardwood dowels sold at hardware stores and to avoid the ones sold in craft stores as the are usually soft and break and warp easily.

ErnieHorning
02-02-2013, 09:44 PM
I just recently discovered plastic covered steel garden stakes. They’re approximately 3/8th inch and easily chuck into my cordless drill. Just drill down to the needed height. Some molds need one, some need two. Re-chuck and pull them back out. Easy, peasy.

Jrd
02-03-2013, 09:22 PM
I just recently discovered plastic covered steel garden stakes. They’re approximately 3/8th inch and easily chuck into my cordless drill. Just drill down to the needed height. Some molds need one, some need two. Re-chuck and pull them back out. Easy, peasy.

That sounds really neat, can you provide some pictures of how you use them and/or a link to them at the hardware store?

ErnieHorning
02-03-2013, 11:28 PM
These come in various lengths and thicknesses. They're not as strong as rebar but they are cheaper and they worked well for me. I got them at clearance prices at Menards up here but I see them in several other places too.
18025 18026 Here's a link to Lowes: http://www.lowes.com/pd_93169-16418-831114_4294778701__?Ntt=Steel+stakes&UserSearch=Steel+stakes&isFlattening=true&productId=3574108&rpp=32&searchQueryType=1

One other idea I wanted to try is the fiberglass marker poles that some people place at the end of their driveway. They're typically florescent orange but who cares if they're inside of a blowmold. These also seem to be relatively strong and there’s no chance of rusting.

scubado
02-04-2013, 12:43 AM
I paint scrap plywood flat black and screw it to the bottom and use lead scuba weights. You could also stop at a tire store and ask if you can get some used wheel weights, they usually have a bucket or two full of lead.

Jrd
02-04-2013, 06:59 PM
These come in various lengths and thicknesses. They're not as strong as rebar but they are cheaper and they worked well for me. I got them at clearance prices at Menards up here but I see them in several other places too.
18025 18026 Here's a link to Lowes: http://www.lowes.com/pd_93169-16418-831114_4294778701__?Ntt=Steel+stakes&UserSearch=Steel+stakes&isFlattening=true&productId=3574108&rpp=32&searchQueryType=1

One other idea I wanted to try is the fiberglass marker poles that some people place at the end of their driveway. They're typically florescent orange but who cares if they're inside of a blowmold. These also seem to be relatively strong and there’s no chance of rusting.

I've seen these before but never thought of using them for this purpose before, thanks for the great idea!

sathya44
05-26-2013, 07:48 PM
Well, I put rocks in my 31" TPI snowman. I put bricks in my 44" GF Santa. That keeps them nice and steady. That prevents them from falling. Unfortunately, you can't do that with inflatables.

kingofkya
05-26-2013, 08:20 PM
Also pay attention the prices with thouse garden stakes homedepo near me sells the 6ft ones for $2.80 and the 8ft ones for $1.

Also those work great for candycanes and bolt cutters work great to cut them down to size. And they add a nice wedge to the end so 2 birds one stone.

Leglamp
05-29-2013, 08:52 AM
That's a good idea!

kingofkya please read my posting about anchoring down blow molds. I've learned from bad experiences on what works and what doesn't when anchoring blow molds.
Just search using my member name Leglamp and you should be able to find it. Blow molds are very hard to repair and take a lot of time to fix when something goes bad.

Leglamp

ErnieHorning
05-29-2013, 01:36 PM
I started using those garden stakes a couple years ago for holding up Halloween blowmolds. They’re pretty flimsy and I tried various ways to pound them into the ground without them bending when they hit rocks. The most successful was slipping some PVC pipe over it first.

Then last year I found the ultimate solution. Just chuck it into a drill! It worked like a charm. I could easily get it down a foot or more. If I hit a rock, just move it over an inch and try again. To remove it, use the drill again.

timpwk
05-30-2013, 11:58 AM
I also had issues with them bending, and got to using wooden dowels instead. My ground is very rocky (there is a quarry a half mile down the road). Is there a certain length you cut the garden stakes down to before using the drill?

ErnieHorning
05-30-2013, 01:17 PM
The ones that I have are 4 feet long. I just drill them down to the height of the blowmold. I’ve learned to always use two and crisscross them. I’ll poke them in the arms or anything else the sticks out. A little bit of spring tension and they stand still and don’t rattle or lift up in the wind. If you live in a windy area, you could toss some baggies filled with sand inside to give them a little more weight.

Macrosill
12-12-2014, 11:10 PM
These come in various lengths and thicknesses. They're not as strong as rebar but they are cheaper and they worked well for me. I got them at clearance prices at Menards up here but I see them in several other places too.
http://doityourselfchristmas.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=18025&stc=1 http://doityourselfchristmas.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=18026&stc=1 Here's a link to Lowes: http://www.lowes.com/pd_93169-16418-831114_4294778701__?Ntt=Steel+stakes&UserSearch=Steel+stakes&isFlattening=true&productId=3574108&rpp=32&searchQueryType=1

One other idea I wanted to try is the fiberglass marker poles that some people place at the end of their driveway. They're typically florescent orange but who cares if they're inside of a blowmold. These also seem to be relatively strong and there’s no chance of rusting.

This is awesome! I bought 7 of the 4' stakes yesterday. I drilled them into the ground last night. Genius!!!

yosemite
12-13-2014, 09:02 AM
I put 3 bags of aquarium sand left over from a fish tank I used to have. (Same theory as Ernie)
Put it through the hole in the back of Santa in the bag , he hasn't fallen over since!

DaveJZ
12-14-2014, 01:33 AM
Farm store. Rebar electric fence posts...

tkrein
12-17-2014, 06:01 PM
I made stands out of PVC then set the blow mold on top. I used sandbags to hold the PVC to the ground let me know I'll take pictures later. Instead of drilling I Used Zip ties around the mold to hold the smaller ones the bigger ones t drilled holes in the bottom and slid the blow mold over the stand.

tkrein
12-17-2014, 06:16 PM
Ohttp://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/12/17/44d4582db9a6e337a2af3b64c457dfcb.jpg

tkrein
12-17-2014, 06:17 PM
Pictures

ErnieHorning
12-17-2014, 06:17 PM
I just tied them to the stake with fishing line. Might not work if you got really high winds that could lift the mold up over the stake but mine never moved all winter.

tkrein
12-17-2014, 06:20 PM
I haven't had a problem even with high winds ground is frozen so pounding stakes sucks so I came up with this method. I have over 30 molds up this year so I wanted something easy

duane.mosley
01-18-2015, 10:23 PM
home depot sells a 24 awg mechanics wire for 3 or 4 dollars. that is what i use to tie my blow molds to the green fencing stakes. the flat spade at the bottom keeps them from spinning as well.

muskiehunter
05-01-2015, 01:45 PM
I use fiberglass "electric fence" posts, they are about 4' long & 1/4" in diameter. I have cut mine to a variety of lengths to accomodate all the different size blowmolds. All my blowmolds either have holes drilled in the bottom or zip ties added to the back. Nice thing about the fiberglass is I can remove them in the middle of winter. A quick twist of the post & they pop right out of the ground.