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olingerjccj
08-17-2010, 11:54 PM
I thought I read somewhere it is ok to use c9 strands for extension cords. Just take out the bulbs and fill the sockets with a little silicone. I just have so many of these and would be good to get some use out of them. What do you think?

Thanks
John

olingerjccj
08-18-2010, 01:02 PM
anyone use these for the extension cords?

John

RandyA
08-18-2010, 07:12 PM
I don't see why not, my C9 stringers are spt2. Someone will have a reason not to use them, but I don't see a problem with them...

Randy

Hogfather
08-19-2010, 11:33 AM
Does it matter what kind of silicone? Would it be weatherproof?
I have some old C9s that I was going to throw away but I may have found a new use for them.

Thanks!

chilloutdocdoc
08-19-2010, 12:12 PM
There's a certain kind of silicone, I believe it's "neutral cure". Some silicon releases acid while curing and would eat apart any metal that it touches. Personally I use hot glue, it's cheap, easy to work with, etc.

I don't imagine it being too hard, just watch your fuses in those cords (if there are any).

olingerjccj
08-19-2010, 12:13 PM
Does it matter what kind of silicone? Would it be weatherproof?
I have some old C9s that I was going to throw away but I may have found a new use for them.

Thanks!

I was gonna use either hot glue gun but might be a bit pricey for how many I have to do or some sorta of bathroom caulk.

John

ErnieHorning
08-19-2010, 01:12 PM
I see no reason you couldn’t use C9 strings as extension cords if you feel the preparation would be worth your time and the clunkiness over a straight cord is acceptable.

I would caution sealing these too much. Just like controller boxes, moisture will find its way in due to expansion and contraction from heat and barometric changes. You don’t need to add more than just shock prevention. The original light strings aren’t completely sealed to allow for some airflow.

There still is a potential issue with the fuse. It’s a failure point whether you leave it there or some how defeat it. It just adds to your time.

It might be a wash though when you figure in your time versus the cost of a new one on sale.

chilloutdocdoc
08-19-2010, 01:28 PM
I see no reason you couldnít use C9 strings as extension cords if you feel the preparation would be worth your time and the clunkiness over a straight cord is acceptable.

I would caution sealing these too much. Just like controller boxes, moisture will find its way in due to expansion and contraction from heat and barometric changes. You donít need to add more than just shock prevention. The original light strings arenít completely sealed to allow for some airflow.

There still is a potential issue with the fuse. Itís a failure point whether you leave it there or some how defeat it. It just adds to your time.

It might be a wash though when you figure in your time versus the cost of a new one on sale.

I would never defeat a fuse, while an extension cord that doesn't have a light socket normally isn't fused, there is an opportunity for moisture to seep in and create a short, the FURTHEST I would go would be to install a higher rated fuse (10A maybe? if the wire will handle it?)

For the amount of work to modify these to real higher-ish grade cords, why not just go get some lamp cord?

olingerjccj
08-19-2010, 03:46 PM
I am keeping the fuses in all the cords. I have probably 60 strands of C9s. If the strand is 24ft x 60 of them 1440ft. So I will just use a dab of silicone in the socket.

Thanks
John

olingerjccj
08-20-2010, 10:21 AM
Another thought on this, I was messing around last night and the sockets pop off the wire. They are stapled in kinda. Would it be better to leave the sockets in or pull them off and tape where the socket was?

Thanks
John

barbotte
08-20-2010, 01:36 PM
Another thought on this, I was messing around last night and the sockets pop off the wire. They are stapled in kinda. Would it be better to leave the sockets in or pull them off and tape where the socket was?

Thanks
John

i also did that too but i notice they are in with some sort of vampire plug therefore it will leave a dot or small pin hole open cable ...not sure if its ok to have those pin hole open in cable...
cheer

hartlove
08-20-2010, 10:52 PM
Another thought on this, I was messing around last night and the sockets pop off the wire. They are stapled in kinda. Would it be better to leave the sockets in or pull them off and tape where the socket was?

Thanks
John

If it were me, that's what I would do. Then I'd have a box full of C9 sockets sitting in my garage, waiting to be used again. :P

Whether that's the best option or not, I can't say.

chilloutdocdoc
08-21-2010, 09:06 AM
Another thought on this, I was messing around last night and the sockets pop off the wire. They are stapled in kinda. Would it be better to leave the sockets in or pull them off and tape where the socket was?

Thanks
John

tough call to say which would be better. I would personally use a bit of electrical tape, or liquid electrical tape, just incase there's a ton of water around.

olingerjccj
08-21-2010, 09:49 AM
tough call to say which would be better. I would personally use a bit of electrical tape, or liquid electrical tape, just incase there's a ton of water around.

I know this may seem like a lot of work, I just have so many c9/c7 strands I want to use them. What about using a torch and melt a bit where the sockets were then tape it. The liquid electrical tape look great too.

Thanks
John

chilloutdocdoc
08-21-2010, 10:51 AM
I know this may seem like a lot of work, I just have so many c9/c7 strands I want to use them. What about using a torch and melt a bit where the sockets were then tape it. The liquid electrical tape look great too.

Thanks
John

very true, was just thinking at the amount of taping you would have to do... You never know. You "could" be fine, however, you "could" have open access to 120V every 1ft of that cord, so the liquid stuff would be a good idea, i don't know how well the insulation melts back together.

plasmata
08-21-2010, 01:40 PM
If you were already considering filling the sockets with caulk why not just cover the prong holes with it? It would take very little to do it.

ErnieHorning
08-22-2010, 12:31 AM
If you were already considering filling the sockets with caulk why not just cover the prong holes with it? It would take very little to do it.A dab of silicone caulk and wipe of the excess with a towel.

Too bad they don't make dark green caulk, wouldn't even know the holes were there.

olingerjccj
08-22-2010, 09:41 AM
Cool thanks for all the replies. I got 10 strands done last night. I am going to try an mix a bit of green food coloring in my silicone mix. See what happens there.

John

oldcqr
08-22-2010, 09:59 AM
FYI...

You can also use old Mini light sets as low-amperage (1-2A) extension cords.

I just finished an article on how to make them (http://www.landolights.com/main/content/view/112/39/) and posted it on my website.

bmcgeeny
08-22-2010, 07:21 PM
Another thought on this, I was messing around last night and the sockets pop off the wire. They are stapled in kinda. Would it be better to leave the sockets in or pull them off and tape where the socket was?

Thanks
John

Buy yourself a can of brush on electrical tape. Available in white, black, yellow, green or red.

Take the sockets off, brush BOTH sides of the wire with brush on tape and your set.

I did that with some of my strobes. 25 bulp strings but only wanted 6 strobes in that length. Left every 4th one in place.

Hogfather
08-22-2010, 08:50 PM
FYI...

You can also use old Mini light sets as low-amperage (1-2A) extension cords.

I just finished an article on how to make them (http://www.landolights.com/main/content/view/112/39/) and posted it on my website.

Very cool! I'm a big believer in re-use and this is a perfect example of it.
Thanks for the article!

oldcqr
08-23-2010, 10:19 AM
Very cool! I'm a big believer in re-use and this is a perfect example of it.
Thanks for the article!

Glad you enjoyed it. Some side notes:

(I think I'll add this to the article,too)

It takes about 15 mins to make one cord, but it's what I call 'monkey work'. Monkey Work is something you can do while doing something else - like watch TV. At the end of this season, put all the sets you would normally throw away into a bin and keep the bin handy. During the summer next year do a couple of strings every night.

Since you can do about 4-5 per hour, you are actually making a pretty good wage. I realize this isn't quite an apples to apples comparison, but look at it this way: Figure these are going to be 24' long. If you were to make or buy a 25' cord, that would be around $4-$5. That's $16-$20/hr for watching TV.

Take all those scrap pieces and recycle them. There are some recycling centers that will buy your old lights, meaning nothing will be wasted - and you'll make even more money.

I couldn't believe how handy these cords were. Last year I only had about 10 of them, and kept thinking "What the heck will I ever do with these?" By the time I was half way through putting stuff up I was wishing I had more!