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View Full Version : A really good (inexpensive) PIC programmer



Andy.wpg
03-03-2010, 10:55 PM
First, a little history. I got my first PIC programmer 12+ years ago. The software was DOS. You used an editor to write your code, then ran the .asm file through the assembler, then, finally, loaded the .hex file into the programming software to program the chip.

No IDE, no debug. Simple. I developed a lot of embedded stuff and never HEARD of debug.

With that in mind. I recently decided to get a new programmer as the devices mine programmed were mostly obsolete.

The one I found has two ZIF sockets on it (18 and 40) and programs virtually EVERY chip Microchip has made to this point. It also does the AT (ATTiny, etc) and a bunch of EEPROMS.

Only one thing about it. It DOES NOT integrate into MPLAB. So, once you write and assemble the code, you have to load the WinPIC800 software to program the chip. This also means, no debug.

BUT, like I said above, I have never used debug and have gotten along just fine.

This programmer was $19 Canadian + $10 shipping. It plugs into a serial port and does not require an external power supply. The Canadian dollar is about $0.93 US right now.

I have played around with it a bit already and am very happy.

So, if the above interests you, check it out at:

http://cgi.ebay.ca/JDM-PIC-Programmer-Microchip-16F84-40-18-Zif-Sockets_W0QQitemZ300402500216QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH _DefaultDomain_2?hash=item45f1626278


BTW, that company are great to deal with, they answer questions and ship VERY fast.

IdunBenhad
03-04-2010, 10:02 AM
Hi:
I think the programmer you have (I have one, too) will work in MPLab as a PicKit2.

I didn't get it from the same company as you. When I bought it, they advertised it as a PicKit2 replacement. I have had no problems with it, but I haven't used it for awhile and I can't remember if I used it directly out of MPLab or not. (I'm not the brightest LED in the string).

Take a look at page 36 of the MPLab IDE Guide.

Professional programmers know: "There is always one more bug"

iconrl
03-04-2010, 10:31 AM
Would this be all I need to start programming PICs? I wasn't sure if there was additional software or hardware components needed.

IdunBenhad
03-04-2010, 12:39 PM
Hi:
You will need the programmer, MBLab and WinPic800. Both of the software programs are free. There is another free programmer also: PICPgm; You will also need a serial port on your computer. I am not sure if a USB to Serial adapter will work as I've never tried it.

PICPgm--------------http://members.aon.at/electronics/pic/picpgm/index.html

You can use WinPic800 or PICPgm to program the pics if you already have the .asm files. For Renards, this is available here on DIYC.

It's fun and I have not had a failure yet when burning the 16F688 used in Renards.

EDIT: I just discovered I was wrong about MPLab recognizing this programmer as a PicKit2. IT DOES NOT.

Just so you'll know. As I said, I'm not the brightest LED in the string, but I'm low maintenance
Idun

Jakeleg1969
03-04-2010, 01:22 PM
The one I found has two ZIF sockets on it (18 and 40) and programs virtually EVERY chip Microchip has made to this point. It also does the AT (ATTiny, etc) and a bunch of EEPROMS.

Only one thing about it. It DOES NOT integrate into MPLAB. So, once you write and assemble the code, you have to load the WinPIC800 software to program the chip. This also means, no debug.

BUT, like I said above, I have never used debug and have gotten along just fine.

This programmer was $19 Canadian + $10 shipping. It plugs into a serial port and does not require an external power supply. The Canadian dollar is about $0.93 US right now.


So...... If I could pick up one of these off ebay for $15 and free shipping, you would consider that a pretty good deal.. Correct?

Jerry in LA

Andy.wpg
03-04-2010, 10:12 PM
So...... If I could pick up one of these off ebay for $15 and free shipping, you would consider that a pretty good deal.. Correct?

Jerry in LA

How'd you pull off free shipping? I had to pay $10, but I'm in Canada, so.......

But yeah, if its the same one, I'm VERY happy with it. And if you're looking to get into making other microcontroller stuff - The ATMega chips are cheap and very cool.

Actually, I bought it not even knowing it does the ATMega chips. I got it 'cause it does all the Microchip stuff, and those are the ones I am most used to. I'm familiar with their architecture and their memory maps, etc.

Andy.wpg
03-04-2010, 10:18 PM
Professional programmers know: "There is always one more bug"

There are no bugs, only undocumented features!

Jakeleg1969
03-04-2010, 11:38 PM
Professional programmers know: "There is always one more bug"

How about unexpected, undocumented features..

Jerry in North Louisiana