PDA

View Full Version : How do u stop the LED from Rusting



Goldie
01-01-2010, 07:36 PM
OK, l pulled my lights down yesterday and most of the LED strings have surface rust on the terminals, if l don't do something about that this year they will rust and break within a year, so, l need some suggestions on how to halt the rusting and then a way to water proof them.

Picture is attached

l'll take any suggestions as long as l can get the product from Australia.
once l have enough suggestions l'll try each suggestion on a part of a string, leave for a while to dry and cure then hang them outside to see which is the most effective.

What l hope to achieve is a sure fire way to water proof LED strings.
l'm expecting this to take around 3 months to complete, once l have the results l'll put together a cost and time to do.

Josh
01-01-2010, 07:47 PM
I have also noticed this on US strands of LEDS. I am using the ones from Walgreens. And notice even after the short season(got a late start) that they already rusted. Last years were rusted and had to be cleaned before they worked.

djulien
01-01-2010, 09:56 PM
OK, l pulled my lights down yesterday and most of the LED strings have surface rust on the terminals, if l don't do something about that this year they will rust and break within a year, so, l need some suggestions on how to halt the rusting and then a way to water proof them.

Picture is attached

What brand are they / where did you get them? We should keep a list of bad ones vs. good ones, so that anyone buying new ones will stay away from the ones that rust out quickly.

As for how to prevent the rust, CorrosionX seems to work well on other electronic components. Maybe spray or dip the LEDs in it too?

don

Goldie
01-01-2010, 10:58 PM
[QUOTE=djulien;98678]What brand are they / where did you get them? We should keep a list of bad ones vs. good ones, so that anyone buying new ones will stay away from the ones that rust out quickly.


l have a variety from Ebay, South Australia and Big W, l will need to pull the green wrap off the South Australia and Big W to check, but the clear Ebay type have all rusted, at the join of the resistor and the join of the wire, some of the ones l have do have a plastic plug between the resistor and the LED but not a the join to the wire and they have rusted there.

Brad Riley
01-01-2010, 10:59 PM
Last year I noticed a few of my Cat5 cable ends had started to rust. Being frugal, some would say cheap, I didn't want to spend the bucks on Corrosion X.
The manufacturer of the products I sell are installed in very harsh environments, so the inside of connectors are coated with this
http://www.lubriplate.com/webstore/detail.aspx?ID=18

I put a small dab on the pins only and no corrosion this year.
A 1.75 Oz tube will last for years.:D

Matt_Edwards
01-01-2010, 11:01 PM
I am intending to spray/dip mine in Fish oil. it won't help your rusted ones other than slowing the process down.

SuperCheap sells rust converter that I have used on bulk steal parts in the past. that may help, but you will need to rinse them well and I am not user if the solution will react with the Copper.

Cold Gal paint - basically zinc powder in an oily carrier and with acetone as solvent. may be fiddly to actually get it into the joints.
Matt

Sky-Lights
01-01-2010, 11:16 PM
Hey Brad m
Corrosion X is made by LUBRIPLATE . ;)

Brad Riley
01-01-2010, 11:25 PM
Hey Brad m
Corrosion X is made by LUBRIPLATE . ;)

Didn't know that, thanks.
Maybe the 630-AA is corrosion X in a tube:o

stanward
01-02-2010, 07:14 AM
It is a pain to deal with this problem! I live in Hawaii, where it rains A LOT! I had many light strings go out before my show started for the season.

Majority of the LED sets I have, I pulled each LED out of it's socket, dab on dielectric grease and reinsert them. This process can take a very long time, so the professional LED sets (CDI, etc.) is the way to go.

Sky-Lights
01-03-2010, 03:08 PM
so the professional LED sets (CDI, etc.) is the way to go

Why is that ? :confused: Do they coat their LED strands sockets or guarantee them not to rust or something ? :confused:

cbell
01-03-2010, 03:21 PM
Why is that ? :confused: Do they coat their LED strands sockets or guarantee them not to rust or something ? :confused:

Most of them don't have sockets, the LEDs are wired directly. So, no sockets to rust. I haven't decided if this is good or bad yet though.

BRETT
01-03-2010, 08:39 PM
I was also concerned with the rust factor in testing during the year.
As this was my first year at blinky flashy and I had already invested lost of money in boards, the budget for light strings was tight. So i purchased lots of cheap and nasty 100 count led strings from Hong Kong. As I planned to have 3 colors on one section of roof, I purchased 500m of shrink tube, 110mm diamter.
Simply measure the length of roof you want cover, cut tube to that lenghth, insert led strings into tube , seal the ends with tape and shrink. Keeps three colors together in one neat and easy to handle package, a completly water tight. I think I only paid about $150.00 dollars for 500M. Thats allot of tubing.

cbell
01-03-2010, 09:31 PM
I was also concerned with the rust factor in testing during the year.
As this was my first year at blinky flashy and I had already invested lost of money in boards, the budget for light strings was tight. So i purchased lots of cheap and nasty 100 count led strings from Hong Kong. As I planned to have 3 colors on one section of roof, I purchased 500m of shrink tube, 110mm diamter.
Simply measure the length of roof you want cover, cut tube to that lenghth, insert led strings into tube , seal the ends with tape and shrink. Keeps three colors together in one neat and easy to handle package, a completly water tight. I think I only paid about $150.00 dollars for 500M. Thats allot of tubing.

Interesting concept. Where did you get the tubing?

andyhough
01-03-2010, 09:32 PM
How do the lights show through? Do they come out of the tubing when you shrink?

budude
01-03-2010, 10:26 PM
I was also concerned with the rust factor in testing during the year.
As this was my first year at blinky flashy and I had already invested lost of money in boards, the budget for light strings was tight. So i purchased lots of cheap and nasty 100 count led strings from Hong Kong. As I planned to have 3 colors on one section of roof, I purchased 500m of shrink tube, 110mm diamter.
Simply measure the length of roof you want cover, cut tube to that lenghth, insert led strings into tube , seal the ends with tape and shrink. Keeps three colors together in one neat and easy to handle package, a completly water tight. I think I only paid about $150.00 dollars for 500M. Thats allot of tubing.

Do you have pictures of that - I agree - sounds like a clean way to do things - you're basically making custom LED light rope - yes?

Goldie
01-03-2010, 11:41 PM
l'm testing the hard wired LED strings, the shrinkwrap sounds like a great idea, l don't think you could do it with icicles though ?

stanward
01-04-2010, 12:51 AM
I know the Ace Hardware near me sells the sealed LED light strings. The LED leads are soldered to the wires, and they are sealed. No galvanic corrosion like the common el cheapo units.

Until then, if you have the el cheapo units, use a lot of dielectric grease!

BRETT
01-04-2010, 04:28 AM
Pictures of continuous shrink tubing, purchased from a Melboune company called
Australia Wrapping Company, but i did find similar products in America for a cheaper but they wouldn't ship to Aus.

IdunBenhad
01-04-2010, 08:49 AM
Hi:
I have only a few LEDs, but didn't notice any rust. Of course, I live in a place where it never rains! Yuma, AZ.

This hasn't been tried, but maybe a can of clear plastic spray "paint" would work. The LEDs would have to be cleaned of rust first, reinserted in the socket and then sprayed. Don't spray the plastic on the pins, as it would probably act as an insulator.

The string could be stretched out and each LED sprayed. Shouldn't take too long, but cleaning the pins probably will take some time.

Just a suggestion.

Idun

christmas-light
01-04-2010, 11:46 AM
Pictures of continuous shrink tubing, purchased from a Melboune company called
Australia Wrapping Company, but i did find similar products in America for a cheaper but they wouldn't ship to Aus.

Hi have you brought that on a web site... If you have then feel free to share the link ;)

C - L

budude
01-04-2010, 03:06 PM
Pictures of continuous shrink tubing, purchased from a Melboune company called
Australia Wrapping Company, but i did find similar products in America for a cheaper but they wouldn't ship to Aus.

How hard is it to position the different strings within the tubing? - now that I look at it, it looks like it would be a lot of work to get three 20-30ft long strings lined up. Also - I would think the sun would cause these to yellow/harden? I don't get a lot of sun here in Northern CA during December but the UV still gets through. Still an interesting way of doing it though...

BRETT
01-04-2010, 03:40 PM
Yes it was tricky to feed a 10 m string into the tubing. All i did was lay the strings out flat in my yard. To make a 6m string hammer a ped into the ground, zip one end of all 3 strings to the peg. Measure 6M and hammer in another peg and tie the other ends to that peg. You now have a 6m string with lots of slack in it. Now find the centre of each string and zip tie together, then repeat this process from the middle back to a peg, and so on. Do this untill most of the slack is removed maybe 4-5 zip ties. Now cut a length of tubing 1 m longer than required lenghth, it does shrink. Tie one end of lights to a length of 20mm conduit and start feeding string into the tubing, connect another length of conduit if needed. Once the end of the string is at the end of the tube untie lights from conduit, slide conduit out of tubing , seal the ends of the bag , a few zip ties around the lights and bag to stop them sliding inside and you have a custom made 3 string light in one neat package. The trade of is that for a 5m lenghth there is more light along the length compared to 8m length, but leds are so bright no one really noticed.
Advantages: Waterproof, easy to manage three strings and hang on roof, althogh tubing is clear it acts as a difuser so blends colors together nicley.
Disadvantage: Hard to store afterwads as they are quite stiff. I have all mine stuffed into a 44 gal drum in the shed.

christmas-light
01-04-2010, 03:57 PM
How many " is it ? (Have found some on ebay)

manrmark
01-04-2010, 04:04 PM
I know this would take a lot of time but could a person silicone around where the light enters the socket (not getting any in the socket) or silicone the entire outside of the socket?

Warlock
01-04-2010, 04:09 PM
There are 2 ways I do this...
1|: silicone dielectric grease found at any automotive supply store.A small dab on the end of any bulb (floods in my case) will guarantee no corrosion.\
2: for my leds I use a silicone spray with the small tube(hose) attached to get into tight spots.So far my leds have lasted 4 years with no signs of issues at all and they are in all kinds of weather including snow,rain and ice...2 sets I removed from my hedge yesterday were incased in 3 inches of ice I used a heat gun to melt and the leds are flawless..So these ideas do work...
A can of spray silicone was $7.00 and has lasted me 4 years
Dielectric grease container with brush $8.00 and has lasted me 10 years as well as being used on 3 cars (bulbs,spark plug wires etc)..
Hope this helps.
Joe...

stanward
01-05-2010, 01:06 AM
I gave up using the dielectric grease on the LEDs and went out and purchased the sealed LEDs from Travis (LED Holiday Lighting).

Some of the LEDs I "greased up" failed during the season.